2P1110907
  • Gavin Adkins

    The marketing has been a bit ott, but this is a hot bike. Until now I have had close to zero interest in an aero road bike, but given that Project One allows you to get it in a custom colour/finish, it’s pretty tempting.

    • Simon

      +1 I ride steel but if ever there was a carbon bike to wrest me away this is it. (But I don’t like the ISP.) I do like colour on bike and this red version is very nice.

  • Nitro

    Wow. I’m sure the mechanics of the world are indeed beating their heads against walls right now in relation to the cable routing.

    As a rider though – loving the new generation of aero bikes where they’ve done everything possible to hide each and every cable. Suddenly makes “old generation bikes” look like they were engineered in the ’80’s….

    • CC

      Aero and simple would be awesome…. until then… Park Tool Internal Cable Routing Kit :)

    • Joe Crawford

      I agree, but at this price, I assume most people, not all, will be going for Di2 so at least that will lessen the cables that need to changed in the future.

  • Sean

    Nice, this looks better than the new s-works venge. The new venge looks like a frankenstein after thought.

    • Andrew Jones

      Man you are way diluded thinking the venge looks like a frankenstein, the madone looks impressive but the venge is a piece of art

  • Robert Merkel

    OK, who wants to fund me to start 3D printing bike light mounts for all these weird and wonderful new shaped bars and seatposts?

    • Adam Fuller

      Why? These are pure race bikes. If you’re riding one of these on your 5.30am training ride you’re probably on the wrong bike.

      • Nath

        Racing road in the ACT often necessitates at least a rear light. Fog is not your friend. Also – if you are racing in Victoria, I believe rear lights must be used in road races.

        • Adam Fuller

          I stand corrected, I hadn’t considered the need for a light when racing.

          • Craig

            The bike comes with brackets to fit lights. Front attaches to the bars as you can see in the pics and the rear has a bracket that slides over the seat clamp assembly. They’ve thought of everything I tells ya!

      • Holby City

        If you don’t train on your race bike at least sometimes then you’re making a mistake.

        • Sean Doyle

          Why? Your race bike and your training bike should be the same fit so it wouldn’t matter really physiologically wise. The only thing that I can think off is the two bikes are wildly different in handling which may make heat of the moment cornering feel a bit vague.

          • Robert Merkel

            Descending at speed on my race bike (a Giant Propel with deep-section wheels) and my everything-else bike (a Lynskey Breakaway) is significantly different, particularly if there’s a crosswind.

            I wouldn’t want to be faced with descents in race conditions without the occasional practice run on the race bike.

            • Sean Doyle

              I’d agree with that. I wasn’t having a go just getting people to elaborate a bit more.

      • Robert Efthimos

        Most amateur racers train and race on the same bike. And many of us are out the door in the pitch black in order to shoehorn our training in with the rest of life’s demands.

    • Adam Fuller

      Why? These are pure race bikes. If you’re riding one of these on your 5.30am training ride you’re probably on the wrong bike.

    • velo_ct

      Well this one in fact comes with light mounts!

      • Albert

        Love the integrated GoPro mount up front. A lot of lights now work with those mounts so that’s a real plus.

  • Andy B

    Trek have done a great job with this one, looks awesome
    Brakes are quite interesting
    Some real nice bikes out this year!

  • Mark

    When are Trek going to release a new Lemond?
    (and since when is drag measured in gm??)

    • geoff.tewierik

      They won’t be, they stopped making Lemond bikes back in 2008 and settled lawsuits in 2010.

      Lemond bikes are now made by Time Sports USA.

    • geoff.tewierik

      They won’t be, they stopped making Lemond bikes back in 2008 and settled lawsuits in 2010.

      Lemond bikes are now made by Time Sports USA.

    • velocite

      Discussions of drag tend to lack rigour. Grams are OK, but without quoting the speed at which this reduction applied it’s not very meaningful.

  • Ian

    So much nicer than the fugly new Specialized Venge

  • Matt

    I guess beauty is in the eye of the beholder, because to me that is one fugly bike

    • Hamish Moffatt

      Those integrated stem/handlebars… my eyes are burning…

  • Roger That

    So, with all these newfangled aero bikes does this mean that aero bikes, lightweight mountain climbing bikes and time trial bikes will now have to be taken to the Tours? Will riders be swapping between frames during stages? If so, it’s getting awfully complicated. And yes, this looks way better than the Venge, although the Scott Foil looks the best of the lot.

    • Andy B

      I think a lot of the time they already do take the three bikes
      ive seen BMC do it before for different stages

    • Myles Patrick

      Don’t forget the Domane/Roubaix/Classics bike for the cobbled stage…

    • Robert Merkel

      I’d be very surprised if you couldn’t build these down to 6.8 kg in which case the climbing bike is redundant.

      At the speeds pros ride up most climbs you still get a small but measurable gain from better aerodynamics so I’d be riding the aero bike if I had the choice.

      Yes, the big teams might take their classics bikes for two reasons – tyre clearance, and marketing. They probably send their bike sponsor the bill.

      • Ben

        I saw them weigh the Race Shop Limited edition and it was 6.7kg OOTB without pedals

  • Daniel

    To quote Arnie From “Predator”, “you’re one ugly mother….”

    • Whippet

      I know it’s not Trek’s brand, but they are putting it out there. My stomach churns when I see that revolting Shimano crank on any bike.

  • Albert

    Another thought just occurred to me. How do team mechanics do “on the fly” brake and derailleur adjustment without any barrel adjusters being readily accessible?

    • max

      it might take them a bit longer now. That’s one unexpected, watt saving benefit!

    • max

      it might take them a bit longer now. That’s one unexpected, watt saving benefit!

  • Albert

    Another thought just occurred to me. How do team mechanics do “on the fly” brake and derailleur adjustment without any barrel adjusters being readily accessible?

  • donncha

    Trek and Specialized both claiming ‘fastest bike in the world’ but, of course, neither releases any data to back up their claim…

    Guess the S5 is still the fastest then.

    • Trek has some data on their web site comparing the new Madone with the S5, Propel and Felt AR2:

      • donncha

        Unfortunately just a graph. Are you aware of any details re: how they tested?

        • I don’t have any but they have been diligent in their previous testing adding dummies and fitting wheels to bikes rather than isolating the bike or wheel.

          My question is, what data could they provide that would be convincing? Ultimately, most would dismiss a manufacturer’s own data as biased. Placed in their shoes, I would be frustrated by this to no end. Yet, I wouldn’t use data from anybody else to develop my product.

          I trust the data but with all the new aero bikes, it is outdated to some degree. However, they have the S5 as a useful benchmark and they have significant gains for some yaw angles.

  • Andy B

    Whats the solution with these new aero bikes for the older guys who don’t ride with a slammed stem (not myself)
    I just feel like this may be a large portion of the market for this type of bike.. seems to be with the last model venge

    • Paolo

      Do some stretching?

    • Rosco

      Cervelo make aero bikes for hubbards.
      Infact, I think thats the only market they make aero bikes for.

    • Sean Doyle

      Aero bike without slammed stem is not aero anymore.

    • Winky

      If you’re not “slammed” (or something like it) and able/willing to spend a lot of time in the drops you shouldn’t be looking at aero bikes. That ship has sailed. Comfort and light weight are your friends now.

  • pedr09

    I am not a Trek fan by nature but I love that cockpit and that the cables are all hidden. This bike looks much better than the new Venge or Scott Foil but I prefer the flatter top tube on the 9.9 compared to the curved top tube on the Race Shop model. Also, Trek’s Project One and the colours and designs you can choose from are just awesome. It’s a good thing I don’t have the money for one, I may have been tempted.

  • Edward

    What are the major benefits of these aero bikes when sitting in behind other riders in dirty air ?, as this is what most cyclists do. If you’re strong enough to ride off the front and into the distance, then you probably don’t need the aero advantages to start with. That new Cannondale just released seems to have the best balance of features and performance of all the most recent high end releases.

    • Ralph

      Good question. My guess is that in the peleton it would have next to no effect, so the only benefits would be when in a breakaway, in a sprint finish (if you’re clear), and when decending when riders can generate space around themselves. It’s all incremental gains though hey.

      • Jesse Jarjour

        When Cervelo launched the first Soloist (now the S series) they published a report on how much aero helps even when sitting in a peloton. I don’t remember the numbers but it was substantial and I’m sure one could find it with a quick google search.

      • Winky

        And closing gaps. There is a compounding benefit that you can close gaps faster thus spending less time in the wind. It can mean the difference between being shelled out the back and not.

    • Liam O’Dea

      The aero benefits flow over to those drafting, pun intended. According to the Madone whitepaper a saving of 19W when using an aero bike solo translates to a saving of 14W when drafting (pg16).

      There’s an interesting off topic from pg30-38 worth reading.

      http://cms.trekbikes.com/pdf/owners_manuals/MY16_Madone_whitepaper.pdf

      • Marc

        Cause of the price…that’s why you want to buy the top of the line Canyon. You save more than 50%.!!!

  • Ralph

    Nice work on the junction box.. love that matte finish as well. Only query is over these ‘Vector Wings’, are they removable to clean under there?

    Also, is this a single model bike? There’s no Madone range anymore right?

  • Albert

    I’m not sure I buy the line that discs are less aero. Surely putting the brakes down at the level of the cranks and the feet, which are already causing all sorts of turbulence, has minimal impact upon aerodynamics.

  • philipmcvey

    I generally love what Trek do – I have owned a Madone and Domane, putting more than 20,000km on each and they are the only frames I’ve ever ridden that have been creak free. But… there’s a few problems with the new Madone. Number one, the 30 day marketing campaign for this bike was hopelessly overblown; too long, too portentous and no mere bicycle was ever going to justify the supercharged hype. Number two, the previous Madone was a fabulously versatile bike, it had nods to aero and light weight, where the new one is all about aero. This market segmentation nonsense is a sales tool more than anything that consumers have been requesting. Personally, I love the Cannondale EVO because it seems to do everything well a la the last Madone. Third; all the proprietary tech packed in to this bike means the starting price is nearly $7k! There are no cheap options (yet). Lastly, this is a matter of taste but it’s not an attractive frame. It looks like form has taken a back seat to function or that the people designing the fork were in a different city to those designing the seat stays. Meanwhile the designers of the top tube seem to have just dug up a first generation Tarmac frame. If Canyon can get an Aus distribution going for the Aeroad then Trek should be worried. Better looks for much fewer bucks.

    • Whippet

      Hi Phil, I am genuinely curious: did the Madone and Domane frames only last 20,000 kms? That seems a very short lifespan.

      • philipmcvey

        Hi Whippet,
        Sorry, must have been a bit ambiguous – I sold the Madone after about 24,000km and I still ride the Domane day in, day out. The Madone frame was very good, but the Domane is amazing. Not a creak, or a click from it after being ridden in all weather, six days a week for 13 months. As a contrast I bought a Specialized Tarmac about six years ago and replaced the frame three times under warranty. None of the frames lasted longer than 15,000km. I call that a short lifespan.
        It’s worth mentioning that Specialized replaced all the frames quickly and with no questions asked. I think one of the most important considerations when buying a carbon bike is the warranty. Trek also has a lifetime warranty. Lifespan isn’t a huge problem if they replace like for like free of charge.

  • david__g

    The vector wings are freaking me out.

    • Winky

      Agree. Insanely complex – and for what?

  • Steel

    I gotta say, I’ve got a real soft spot for Trek bikes. They’re clearly one of the most innovative manufacturers out there – along with the other North American makers.

    Yes, I doubt the Madone 9 would be all that useful for me at my level of capability, but as someone who appreciates a fine machine, I get a bit excited with the way their engineers approach these problems.

    As a side note, I wonder if the outer seat tube could be considered an aerodynamic fairing too!

  • tertius_decimus

    I thought Visp makes ugliest bikes in existence but this by far outweighted Visp’s lack of taste. This is the ugliest bike I’ve ever seen in my life. A true eye-sore.

    • SeanMcCuen

      would it help if it had lipstick??

      • tertius_decimus

        Sure. With lipstick everything looks like a masterpiece.

  • SeanMcCuen

    my new favorite bike, ever. beautifully executed.

  • sss

    Why Spend all this time trying to make the bike more aero and then slap a mount for your Garmin etc out in the breeze. There is enough realestate in that integrated stem and bar to mount your Garmin in it.
    Also if your going through all the effort to make an integrated brake why not go the full hog and do a hydraulic version. That way you dont lose any braking performance due to all the bends in the cable and it certainly makes the mechanics life easier once the bike is assembled.

    • Andy B

      According to the recent specialized video a garmin mounted in line with the bars incurs no additional resistance

  • James L

    Is there anyone who undertakes independent testing of the performance qualities of these bikes? We have seen a spate of new releases in anticipation of the tour, and it seems as though they all claim increased comfort, aero performance, stiffness, etc, upon which they probably all deliver to a certain extent. However the gains often seem to be measured relative to varying benchmarks, i.e. the Tarmac SL4, the Emonda, the previous Scott, the ‘closest competitor’, giving marketing departments plenty of room to identity selling points. I appreciate the effort taken by Specialized to demonstrate their claims, but even in their claims there is a lack of comparison to other bikes on the market that are vying for the same customers. I’d find it fascinating to see the Madone, Venge, Foil, Aeroad, S5, etc, pitted against one another in a standardised test. At the same time I can’t see this happening, as far as I can tell all the manufacturers benefit from the current ambiguity as they can all make the claims they want. Perhaps that is one of the reasons why you don’t see bike weights published these days, other than ‘lightest production frame’ weights.

    • Sean Doyle

      The only way really is to having an industry agreed upon bench mark bike. That ain’t ever going to having. The big ticket for consumers these days is to buy the bike that turns them on the most since they are all damned good these days (subjective). If you do you own wrenching maybe ignore the overly complicated bikes like this Trek if you don’t then what does it matter. I would bet that the Trek with all its moving parts will have creaking issues at some point.

      The one issue for me is fit. You can only go so far before you have every conceivable combination in stock to achieve the correct fit. The cost and wait times would be prohibitive in a lot of cases not to mention the issue of being stranded with non functioning proprietary components.

  • Winky

    Does no-one else think that the whole iso-speed coupling thing is insanely complex? Two set-tubes? WTF? I also don’t want more bearings/joints/hinges etc on my bike. I love the way that BMC do it with low-joining seatstays, turning the seat-tube into a big leaf spring (and getting some aero benefit as a bonus, perhaps)

  • Winky

    “No cables are visible reducing frontal drag trivially and meaninglessly, but at bringing significant inconvenience and cost” – There, I fixed it for you.

  • Winky

    “No cables are visible reducing frontal drag trivially and meaninglessly, but at bringing significant inconvenience and cost” – There, I fixed it for you.

  • Alex L

    The hype for this bike really was a bit much. “A game changing bike”? Come on guys, we’re talking about #marginalgains at huge expense here.

    What it does seem like is that Trek (and Specialized with their new Venge) are trying to change the game in the way people buy bikes and aftermarket service. The level of integration certainly looks impressive, but it forces customers to rely on Trek-only stores. Want to change your stem length/angle or the bar width/drop/reach? You’re locked into only a handful of options. From what I’ve seen the integrated stem/bar combos aren’t available in all desired combinations. Want to change only the stem length? That’s an expensive exercise compared to just changing a traditional stem.
    This affects fitting too, instead of getting fitted at a physio and swapping standard stems and bars you rely on the Trek store to appropriately fit you, something that I would personally prefer to do with a qualified physio.

    There’s a discussion below about mounting lights/computers. And sure, they’ve made an allowance for it.. but again, you’re locked into using only a narrow range of lights that fit, most obviously Bontrager branded ones.

    I’m yet to be convinced by those centrepull brakes, but even more so by the serviceability and availability of spare parts. Again, back to the Trek dealer it is.

    Personally, I don’t think the small gains in aerodynamics by the high level of integration are worth the trade offs in lack of spare parts and customization. Perhaps a large proportion of the cycling population walk into a store, buy a bike, are fitted easily and then never need to make any further changes to fit and then always service the bike at the same store. But I service my own bikes, I’ve changed my fit several times and I’m a tinkerer. This bike has too many trade offs to be truly appealing.

  • Horizont_Bike

    Great article about the Trek Madone 9! Thanks for that. Ive found another article (but in german language) about the bike, just if someone is interested: http://roadcycling.de/rennrad-ausruestung/rennrad-news/profi-bikes-technik/trek-madone-9-2016

  • Marc

    The price is insane…that’s why you want to buy the top of the line Canyon. You save more than 50%.!!!

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