• Thomas

    Another solo ride option is to plan your ride near railway stations, that way if you have a breakdown, getting to the train station is the fall-back plan.

    • Simone Giuliani

      Thanks for that tip Thomas . It’s a great way to open up the ride options.

    • susannunes

      Doesn’t work out in the western part of the United States.

  • Ewan

    I love riding with my mates but there are times I relish cycling alone too. Great advice here for anyone worried about going it alone, especially the identification factor as well as letting someone know a rough time you plan to return. My girlfriend gets worried if I haven’t been ‘gramming in the last 3 hours :)

  • Blake

    plan your ride so that you get a tailwind home. when you’re tired and have no one else to sit behind, you’ll get home not feeling too wrecked

  • libby

    totally agree with what you said, I did the 100 on sunday with a friend and got my first ever flat tyre… I had the spare tube but her help was invaluable… then I got the second flat! this time I had to use her spare tube…. and it took longer to change ugh! I would have given up if I had of been alone.. we didnt see another rider at all durning both tube changes! Thats why I dont ride too far from home when alone :)

    • Aaron Heaysman

      If you ride where you know others ride often, I’m sure if you have an issue someone will stop and help, I know I always ask if other riders are ok when stopped on the side of the road.

    • Simone Giuliani

      Getting two flats when out on such a cold, wet hundred couldn’t have been fun Libby, but you sure have been lucky to not have had any flats before that.

  • Derek Maher

    Good discussion and tips Simone.I always make sure to carry some spare cash just in case your mobile goes out of action and you have to call at a house and ask to use their phone.I live in a rural area so phone boxes are a rarity.Plus as a last resort one can call a cab ?.

    • Simone Giuliani

      Thanks Derek, the cash for a phone call and cab is definitely a good back up plan.

    • Nath

      I always have a five dollar note in my spares kit. In Australia (for our unfortunate friends living elsewhere) our notes or bills are essentially plastic so they make for a great liner of the tyre if you are unlucky enough to get a cut in the casing. Gets you home and it is always a pleasant surprise to find a few bucks when you finally get some new rubber. Not sure how traditional paper notes would serve.

      • GTGT

        Gel or energy bar wrappers are also excellent for this. Also good are the plastic express post envelopes

  • Stuart

    Hi team. I think the best investment for the solo rider is RACV Anywhere Assist. A $200 per year investment guarantees that you have a taxi ride home for you and your bike no matter where you are – and someone helpful and useful on the other end of the phone. Have had cause to use this a number of times on the bike

  • Craig Lawrence

    I caught the train from Melbourne to Warrnambool arrived at 11:30am, had lunch and rode back along the Great Ocean Road, then inland towards Colac and Geelong. I was solo without tools to repair anything but with other riders an hour and a half behind me. I’d say that was the most stunning ride I’ve done in years…the scenery had more impact due to the isolation. I’d recommend you plan something similar on a warm summer evening with a late sunset. Cheers

    • Annie.

      Me too, I decided to do kind of a “small epic ride” several weeks ago. I don’t exactly know why, but it had been in my head for a while to do that, and somehow, I chose a pretty stupid day to actually ride a gps track I had found on my roadbike: I was very tired with body and legs exhausted from a lot of training and racing the weeks before and it was one of the first really hot days so my body hadn’t had the chance to adapt to riding in hot conditions. Oh, and I only left towards midday which was not all too clever, too.

      Off I went: 130 k and 3000 m ascending.

      I already knew the first as well as the last bit of the track, but even those were roads rarely ridden. Going into the first steep climb I thougt I would never arrive at the top: I felt horrible. Nevertheless, I decided to ride in my own slow rythm and take one k after the other, seize every sight and being alone in that wonderful nature. I rarely ever met anybody. Soon, I got hooked: I still felt weak and tired, but it didn’t matter that day. 130 k is not much for me, but it was that day. Also, the incredible heat was a challenge.

      But as @disqus_lWew8wE6t9:disqus described in his comment, it was a very intense experience. I had to suffer a lot that day, at least towards the end. But I forbid myself to look at heartrate, speed or anything but the arrows on my bike computer and enjoyed every moment.

      Hence, I don’t agree you should stay on wellknown soil on solo rides.

      However, I usually have everything I need with me: spare tube, pump, “emergency energy bar”, food, full bottles, a few coins so I can get myself sth. to drink at a gas station (even on sundays where shops are closed here).

      pic: view over the Neckar river towards Heidelberg: Nearly done!

      • Simone Giuliani

        It sounds like an incredible day out on the bike Annie with that sense of exploration, challenge and connection with your surrounds only heightened by taking it on alone. I can certainly understand why you would not want to forgo an experience like that.

  • kamoteQ

    In my case, it’s hard to find someone with the same riding taste(half-day rides) and similar fitness level among other things. This one’s a good article.

  • susannunes

    In forty years of riding as an adult, I have almost NEVER ridden with others. That is because I like solitude and don’t want to be around people all the time. Not only that, but riding with others puts a competitive aspect to it. The only time I would consider riding with others is in an organizing touring as part of a travel package (such as WomenTours). Otherwise, forget it.

  • Oaklegs

    For those tight tyres that are hard to replace and you are alone always carry a toe strap and tighten it around the tyre and wheel whilst you get the next part of the tyre onto the rim.


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