Doha - Qatar - wielrennen - cycling - radsport - cyclisme - Peter Sagan (Slowakia / Team Tinkoff - Tinkov)  pictured during the Road Race of the UCI Road World Championships 2016 in Qatar - photo LB/RB/Cor Vos © 2016

Your Monday Daily News Digest

by Matt de Neef

October 17, 2016


In your Monday edition of the CyclingTips Daily News Digest: Sagan outsprints Cavendish and Boonen to win world championships road race; Amalie Dideriksen sprints to surprise win in Doha Worlds road race; Nathan Elliott and Tessa Fabry victorious at the Melbourne to Warrnambool Classic; Anna Meares calls time on her history-making career; Wiggins’ troubles continue with news of missed anti-doping test; UCI unveils 2017 Women’s WorldTour; 2017 Dubai Tour extended to five stages; Crash ends Gaviria’s Doha Worlds; John Degenkolb remonstrates with Jens Debusschere; Kyle Strait charges down a steep exposed line at Red Bull Rampage; Race to the Rock – the documentary.

Doha - Qatar - wielrennen - cycling - radsport - cyclisme -  Cavendish Mark (GBR / Team Dimension Data) - Sagan Peter (Slowakia / Team Tinkoff - Tinkov) - Boonen Tom (Belgium / Team Etixx - Quick Step)    pictured during the Road Race men of the UCI Road World Championships 2016 in Qatar - photo Davy Rietbergen/Cor Vos © 2016

Sagan outsprints Cavendish and Boonen to win world championships road race

by Shane Stokes

For the second year in a row, Peter Sagan (Slovakia) has won the elite men’s road race at the Road World Championships, this time hammering in ahead of Mark Cavendish (Great Britain), Tom Boonen (Belgium) and Michael Matthews (Australia) to win the bunch sprint in Doha.

Sagan was part of a large group which forced its way clear in crosswinds with 178 kilometres remaining in the 257km race, building a solid advantage over the rest of the field. Several race favourites missed out, including Germans Andre Greipel and Marcel Kittel, and despite long chase efforts, those behind never got back on.

The group remained together until 2.4 kilometres to go when Tom Leezer (Netherlands) jumped hard and got a gap. Those behind looked at each other and he built a lead of six seconds. Belgium returned to the front and managed to drag him back with 200 metres left, after which the sprint started.

Sagan jumped hard and went to the right of the riders, close to the barriers. Cavendish’s leadout man Adam Blythe went to the left and a moment’s hesitation by Cavendish saw him miss out.

“I don’t believe it. I am still in shock. I am very, very happy for that.” Sagan said afterwards. “I felt that there was a bit of a headwind, so I thought I have to go from a little bit back. I was also a little bit lucky as Nizzolo didn’t close [the door on] me. If he had, we would have crashed for sure as I wasn’t going to brake.”

1. sk
2. gb
Great Britain
3. be

Click through to read more at CyclingTips.

Today’s feature image comes from Cor Vos and shows a jubilant Peter Sagan winning his second consecutive world title.

  • Andy B

    Great Racing at the world champs!

    All the best in retirement Anna, you’ve been an inspiration to watch :)

    • If only they had sent the lead bunch into the desert one more time to split it up even further!

      • De Mac

        The ~170Km to go point was absolutely sensational! And to think that the Belgians said they would do it, yet most of the peloton missed the split(s). The race was well worth staying up for!

  • marcus_moore

    Kudos to the women for this Daily News Digest:
    The Warny may be the only race in the world where the men & women start at the same location (at the same time) – no ‘hitting off from the women’s tee”!!
    The only finisher for the Race to the Rock was a woman – great video Cyclingtips!

  • jules

    that was nice of Degenkolb to give Debusschere a refreshing spray of water in the blistering Qatar heat

  • Stompin

    Sagan, wow!

  • Abdu

    That commentator of the Worlds men’s RR finish was very funny, no mention of Sagan until he was 50m over the line and nearly filled the entire screen. He was really pulling for Cavendish too, did he have money on him? Barely a mention of anyone else, when he ran through the top 10 afterwards they were all news to me because the commentator sure hadn’t called any of them.

    • Bex

      obvs not the sbs feed, what were you watching, the BBC

    • Ben Greeve

      The calling in the final was shocking. I only watched the replay so I knew what to expect so it seemed even stranger, but that’s no excuse.

    • Wolfticket

      Carton Kirby on Eurosport gets a lot of (often very justifiable) criticism but to be fair to him, of the 3 English commentaries I’ve heard, he was the only one in the final to actually keep up with what was happening in real time and call that Sagan was going on the inside and took it as he crossed the line.

      It is a super tough job though.

  • Abdu

    Did Degenkolb get sanctioned for that? Pretty p1ss poor effort from him. I can understand his frustration, but it’s a ‘legit’ tactic used often so surely is no surprise. It’s not unforseeable that Debusschere might have reacted by trying to avoid the bottle/spray and caused a crash. I bet Degenkolb would not do that to another rider like say Bouhanni, so he just looks like a bully.

    • Dirk Demol

      He’s been given a 2 year ban. However Degenkolb has already suggested he will appeal the sanction.

      He also conceded he wouldn’t do that to Bouhanni because “he is scared of him”.

      • Dave

        I’ve just heard that he has taken a deal to have this ban replaced by serving as the training partner for Nick Kyrgios for the week before the French Open next year.

    • jules

      I’m less understanding of his frustration. Trying to encourage Debusschere to ignore his national team responsibilities on the flimsy premise of trade team allegiances, a line of argument clearly motivated by Degenkolb’s own national national team allegiance (to Greipel and Germany) – is just plain hypocritical.

      Debusschere should have given it straight back to him.

      • Dirk Demol

        Where’s Wegelius when you need him.

      • Dave

        Agree. To impress his employers for next year, he should have helped to hold back the group as Nizzolo was in the front group.

        However, it’s quite possible that the side of Degenkolb’s brain arguing for his national team won the internal debate by way of default. The pro team side of his brain would have been too busy to engage in that debate, instead being confused by wondering whether to work for Giant-Alpecin or Trek-Segafredo and trying to work out why on earth Marcel Kittel was working for a Lotto rider rather than his Etixx teammate up the road.

  • david

    Does anyone have any insight as to why Qatar would actually want to host the World Championships? I’ve heard and read plenty of discussion around the fact that the UCI have basically awarded the race to the highest bidder etc. But I can’t understand why Qatar would actually bid at all. No one there is interested in it (judging by the crowds), no one except the riders and staff travelled there for it (also based on crowd numbers), so what’s their agenda?

    • Dirk Demol

      Tax write off.

      • Dave

        Sovereign nations don’t need tax write offs.

        It was actually about giving the local regime some international legitimacy. Countries that support major western sports like cycling, soccer and MotoGP must be pretty decent, don’t you think.

    • Bex

      show the world they exist and that it’s not just a desert. although why they care if anyone else wants to visit them or not i have no idea.

      • jules

        they have figured out that oil will not line their coffers forever. they’re trying to join the ‘real world’ and with their sovereign wealth, a practical option is to buy exposure via this type of event. cycling is cheaper than other sports. I dunno if it’s working.

    • Andy B

      Because some single guy wanted it?

    • Dave

      They got it because nobody else offered an alternative. All the other bidders dropped out before it got within a few months of being put to a vote.

  • Dirk Demol

    Serious comment: Huge Anna Meares fan. Very courageous, an inspiration.

    I read yesterday she required 4 x cortisone injections just to compete at Rio. I know nothing about TUEs, but I assume she would’ve needed one for the injections.

    If someone needs 4 shots just to get through 2 events at the Olympics, should they too, not be able to ride?

    For example, some commentators have suggested that’s Wiggo shouldn’t be able to use the TUEs he did to get through a Grand Tour; something I’m starting to subscribe to.

    I know I am comparing apples with oranges in terms of meds, but I think the same applies with Meares. Thoughts?

    • I don’t know the answer but I think it’s a fair question to ask.

      • Dirk Demol

        I’m with you. It gets so cloudy. I’ve always said doping is never black and white. TUEs throws in about 100 shades of grey.

    • jules

      there are 2 issues here:
      1. should someone ride at all if they really need such powerful medications?
      2. did they really need such powerful medications for their medical condition, or for performance reasons?

      Wiggo is in trouble because of suspicions around #2. Meares is not (yet – hopefully not ever).

      • Dirk Demol

        Yep agree Jules [as per usual].

        I was looking at it entirely from perspective of point #1. Of course, I don’t know the dosages Meares needed to get through her campaign, I just think it’s getting to the stage where TUEs will need to be looked at from a completely new perspective; as a way to cheat.

        [Not suggestion Meares has; I’d be devastated if she did].

        • Andrew O’Neill

          I understand the questions around Meares with the cortisone. However for cortisone to be effective as an anti-inflamatory / pain relief, you need to avoid exercise for a minimum of 3 days. Not the best prep before the biggest event of your career.

          One of my mates ran the marathon in Rio, but suffered an achilies injury a bit over a month out. Had two weeks off, no improvement. Had a cortisone injection, no improvement. Had a second injection, minor improvement. Raced in Rio and had the worst race of his life because he was so underdone.

          Moral of the story, if you need 4 shots of cortisone just to get to the start line 1. Your desperate to get there, 2. Your not going to be 100%.

          • Dirk Demol

            Thanks for that insight.

            As you can tell I know nothing about cortisones.

            Still will be interesting – what happens – if anything comes with TUEs with WADA.

          • jules

            does it say when Anna received those injections? it strikes me as possible that she had them earlier on, giving her enough time to rest and recover, before building for Rio.

            that’s an interesting insight Andrew, but you do seem to assume her course of injections followed the same pattern/timing as your runner mate.

    • Dave

      And the answer is that such local injections to relieve inflammation are not banned, and therefore do not need a TUE.

      Glucocorticoids are only banned when used via oral, rectal, intravenous or intramuscular routes.

  • velocite

    Paganini’s skill on the violin was so great that people claimed that he had sold his soul to the devil.

    • jules

      I thought that was Robert Johnson but either way I take your point :)

  • Dirk Demol

    There is one downside to Sagan’s win overnight. Means his EU jersey will be in mothballs for next 12 months.

    • True, but I don’t think anyone will be complaining. Except maybe Julian Alaphilippe. ;)

    • Dave

      He should give it to Cav as an insult.


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