Oakley Radarlock Review

by CyclingTips


Oakley’s Radars have redesigned with an hinge mechanism that easily releases its interchangeable lens in seconds. Oakley sent me some of their new Radarlock sunglasses the other day to try out and here are my thoughts.

The “Switchlock” incorporated into Radarlock is similar in concept to Oakley’s Jawbone. I remember back in the day when Oakley’s lenses just snapped into place; they were basically held in by force. Even though I never had a problem with my Radars, it made me cringe every time I swapped those lenses. Oakley says that this led to uneven pressures on the lens which caused optical distortions. The “Switchlock” mechanism of interchanging the lenses eliminates any distortion.

The hinged or "Switchlock" built into the frame that secures the lens in place. The hinge allows for an easy lens swap without the use of force to secure.

It’s hard to tell if what Oakley says about Switchlock technology holds true or not, but it’s undeniable that their optical quality is absolutely superbe. If only the real world looked as good as when these sunglasses are on. I rate my Jawbones’ optics just as highly except I prefer the fit and wide field-of-view of the Radarlocks. The Radar design grasps my head better and tend to not slide down on the nose like my Jawbones do. I do favor the “in-your-face” aesthetics and customisation options of the Jawbones however. Those who prefer fit and function over form usually choose the Oakley Radar design over the Jawbones.

The Radarlocks come with two lenses. One for bright and sunny conditions and another for low-light conditions.

Radarlock sunglasses are sold in two styles: The Pitch which have a slightly larger lens and reduced ventilation, and the Path (shown in the photos here). Both come in many frame colours to choose from and 12 lens colours including polarised and photo-reactive options.

Oakley includes a hardshell case, a cleaning-cloth pouch, a second nose-piece, and a second lens option with RadarLock.

Editors Picks