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  • 900Aero

    So, when’s the wedding?

  • Marcus

    Excellent article! I hate tag alongs mostly and on the commute to work especially. I have always thought that it was just me being a prick, but glad to read that I’m not alone.

  • jules

    I pretty much follow all of these rules when I put my front wheel right behind another rider’s back wheel and see how long I can hold them

  • Chipomarc

    I prefer having Mozart’s Eine kleine Nachtmusik playing on my Sennheiser Momentum headphones as I train on the bike.

  • RayG

    Just don’t jump on my wheel. Especially unanounced. You’ve got no idea where I’m going or what I’m going to randomly do on my way there. I ride bunches all the time, but we all know where we’re going and the rules of the bunch. And don’t jump into our bunch for pretty much the same reasons. I know I’m anti-social in a lot of ways, but this is just a safety thing.

  • Warwick

    Great article. Thought I was the only one who suffered the curse of tag-alongs! I once had a rider decide he wanted to follow me for a 120k after I’d passed him said hi and he was “only out for 40k”, I told him I was heading out for a big SOLO ride but he didn’t seem to take that as a hint. Nice enough guy, but worst part was he had the most horrendous creaking BB which I had to endure for the next three hours.
    Have also had a couple of times riders jump on the back of a small group unannounced then complain when they haven’t had a pothole pointed out for them, sorry mate didn’t know you were there!

  • ML

    Related topic that’s been on my mind is “How to Get Invited on a Group Ride”. Here’s how I would start my list (coming from someone who often organizes and leads no-drop or beginner rides, but also values getting my butt kicked from time to time):

    1. Don’t flake. If a new ride buddy flakes 2x without an amazing excuse, you’re kinda off the list.

    2. Show up at something and work from there. Even if a ride isn’t exactly what you’re looking for, show up (maybe start with a no-drop ride if you’re not sure) and meet people there who can clue you in to other rides. It is harder to answer questions like “what is the average pace” and “am I ready for that ride?”; easier to see how someone is pedalling or how smooth their lines are and suggest some good options from there.

    3. Be self sufficient and roll with the punches. If the group is riding piano, don’t attack on your first time out with them. On the flip side, if you’re dropped three times, do your own thing — have a smartphone and know how to use it. (Unless it’s advertised as a no-drop ride. Then the people who drop you are jerks.)

    4. Have fun! Smiles are almost always better company than frowns.

    What would be on your lists?

    • Jessi Braverman

      Check your email!

  • Spider

    So a tag-along is the next step up from a wheel-sucker? The wheel-sucker just leeches off you and pretends you don’t exist whilst the tag-along wants some kind of instant relationship?

  • winkybiker

    I dunno, some of you seem a bit uptight about wheelsuckers and tag-alongs. Just roll with it. Have a chat. Learn something. Form a relationship. Or don’t. Who cares?

  • Daniel

    This article makes me cringe at my younger self…

  • Derek Maher

    Good subject Chloe.These days I tend to spin along on my own.I always salute passing riders with a cheery hello.
    My days of the group training ride,s are over so its just relaxed cycling for the fun of it.

  • velocite

    Supportive, your Dad, is he Chloe?

  • Boftie

    I would add: 6. Knew when to peel off and leave me alone. I don’t mind tag alongs but wish they would take the hint when, after a while I start to say things like “Thanks for the company but I need to slow my pace a bit here as I’m flagging? Feel free to leave me!”

  • JJR7777

    Also having a tag-along/wheel sucker on the early morning commute with a bright flashing strobe light….. A bit annoying after 5 k’s.

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