Aspen - Colorado  - wielrennen - cycling - radsport - cyclisme -  Taylor Phinney (BMC Racing Team)  pictured during USA Pro Challenge 2013 (2.HC) stage - 1  - photo Brian Hodes/Cor Vos © 2015****USA OUT****
  • Neil

    Can’t help but be impressed by Taylor Phinney’s return. Super impressive.

    • Bex

      agreed, it’s one thing to come back and be part of the peleton; but to be winning again.. very nice. Shows he could’ve come back earlier I guess but wanted to wait till he was happy with form.

  • Andy B

    Phinney Winning.. Best news :) #phinneyfan

    • Michele

      Excellent. I wasn’t aware of Phinney winning until I came in here.
      What a great banner pic to be given the news.

  • Stirrer

    “Meh”…

    (several Spanish riders looking at the clip above of rider holding the door handles up the climb)

  • Anon N + 1

    The article on road risks recommends a “hook turn” in certain situations. Unfortunately, I am not familiar with this term and it is not explained here or in the article at the link. Would someone please explain “hook turns”? Thanks.

  • Strictly B Grade

    Team Sky are all about the science and marginal
    gains but they’ve never checked Froome’s VO2?

    • Samaway

      They’re throwing up quite the smokescreen

      • horses

        Yep – there’s not much point unless they also release his pre-2011 numbers.

    • jules

      i take that with a grain of salt, however, I can’t recall reading of VO2 being used to guide training strategies or loads, etc. maybe it’s just not important info for them?

      • Sean Doyle

        That’s my general take though it’s generally shown that exceptional athletes have high V02. I would have thought all of their testing would have been around the FTP number and not much else. I don’t know much about power training than the basics so I’m speculating. Their language does not make me comfortable though.

        • jules

          power is the key measure, isn’t it? if a rider can produce a certain FTP or other power measure, you wouldn’t think “but what’s they’re VO2?” who cares? it’s going to be high, but it’s of little consequence.

          • Bex

            but why wouldn’t they find that out along with everything else. if they’re doing tests, why just do power; they’d be doing lactate, HR, everything else… as if they wouldn’t have vo2 in the mix as well. Plus VO2 has been one of the numbers talked about for so long (lemond, mig,…), i’d bet froomy wants to know how he stacks up against past ‘ledgends’.

            • jules

              but if you go back to Froome’s early career, as the story is told to us, he had that disease Bilharzia i think that meant he wasn’t identified as an obvious champion. it was only after he overcame the disease that he started emerging as a potential team leader. so he didn’t (as far as I know) come through a talent program where they hooked him up to all the test rigs and stamped “future Tour winner” on his forehead. obviously some people don’t believe that story, I am aware.

          • Yep power is what I thought of straight away. Power, FTP, and heart rate, to indicate how stressful/efficient that production of power is. i.e. if 375 watts (random figure) is averaged over 90 mins and heart rate is through the roof, then that may indicate the rider is in a stressed/non recovered/catabolic/longer term fatigued state. Likewise if the rider just can’t get wattage or heart rate up, it can also point to deeper fatigue. Obviously the goal on the desirable side is too produce same power at lower HR and of course increased power with minimal HR raise. Apologies if this was a bit obvious….

          • Sean Doyle

            Yes, I’m agreeing with you, that’s what I was trying to say.

      • Paulmapp

        I’m confused. Why only Chris Froome? Why not all the top 3 at grand tours and selected other winners at random? This method seems a little confusing considering no single rider competes week in week out at exactly the same FTP and fatigue level in races or in training macrocycles for that matter. Given all top riders have a training peak / peaks throughout there season it seems as though the only meaningful data would be real time data at the races during the heat of battle. Fit control power meters and heart rate monitors to athletes and stream it live. Let us and the experts see the numbers when they matter. Lets see what sitting is behind a strong team is saving a team leader. Lets see the attack data. Lets see the recovery effort data. Ignore wind and drag differential year to year. Give us the real picture. The sport owes us this much. Kudos to Froome for trying, even if its a little misguided.

        • jules

          the issue is more tangible if projected on an individual. a group of riders can’t respond in the same way as an individual, be pressured, or have their reactions scrutinised in the same way. it’s about packaging for the media and to its audience. not about a methodical, impassive assessment of the peloton or its upper echelons.

  • Simon

    +1 to Phinney’s win, an exercise in patience, proper medical care and solid rehab with a strong dash of self belief.
    Re the Vic road crash stats and accompanying diagram. Near my house is a busy stretch of road where waiting traffic often waves drivers through the gaps but they rarely acknowledge the oncoming cyclist. I never trust what I can’t see through so I am hyper vigilant and have thus avoided many possible collisions.

    • Dave

      Always a hazard unless there is a proper separated and raised bike lane to clear the line of sight and calm down the speeds, with the cross street having additional give way signs in both directions for traffic crossing the bike lane.

      • winkybiker

        Separated bike lanes often deliver cyclists into intersections in odd and unexpected ways.

        • Dave

          Only if you make it up as you go every time. Follow best practice in every instance and you’ll be fine.

          • Winky

            I’m specifically thinking of two circumstances: The two-way lanes that have cyclists essentially on the wrong side of the road for their direction of travel (these are very common in downtown Vancouver) and the also common kerbside lanes (segregated by barriers or not) where cyclist appear from behind the driver turning across their path.

            • Dave

              Two-way bike lanes are by no means best practice for urban bike lanes though, it’s best to look at what the Dutch and Danish are doing instead of the Canadians making it up as they go along.

              Again, with kerbside lines it’s simply a matter of doing it right – put the bike lane entry into the intersection ahead of the car entry, and prioritise if necessary.

              All stuff that has already been worked out and just needs Ctrl+C Ctrl+V rather than “innovation.”

    • Andy B

      I think the safest best is always assume you haven’t been seen

      • winkybiker

        Yep.

    • Sean

      Surely there could be legal implications for the driver who is directing other traffic by waving them though the apparently clear section of road.

      • jules

        what sort? you and you alone are responsible for your control of your vehicle. if you choose to delegate that control to a 3rd party, remember you can’t delegate your legal responsibility for consequences.

        • Sean

          I didn’t say anything about delegating control, I was talking about directing traffic – I assume joe public isn’t authorized.

          This guy is safer than some jerk waving another car though a gap without checking if it’s clear of cycling or motor cyclists, yet he was at risk of prosecution. At least he has a stop sign and is wearing hi-vis.

          http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/victoria-state-election-2014/bridge-road-trader-takes-law-into-own-hands-in-tram-super-stop-protest-20141118-11ozkf.html

          • RayG

            It’s still the driver turning right’s responsibility to make sure the road is clear. The stationary driver waving is doing nothing more than letting the other driver know he’s not going to move forward into the space. Anyone thinking he has any idea what is coming up on his rear left is fooling only themselves.

            Not surprised this is common. it’s what happened to me.

            • Sean

              Thanks Ray, i don’t see where I was suggesting it wasn’t the turning drivers responsibility. Re-read my question, i didn’t imply some fool directing traffic would take the blame for some other driver driving blindly across traffic. Also in my experience most drivers don’t do a wave signalling they’re remaining stationary, i’m not even sure how that would look (would everyone understand it??). In my experience most times they give a clear signal for the other party to proceed through a gap. Hence why i asked about directing traffic, because that is what they’re doing.

              • RayG

                Yes. They’re saying ‘please proceed through the gap because I’m not going to move’. Nothing more. Good luck with your own safety if you assume otherwise.

                • Sean

                  Your inability to comprehend a basic question and turn it into something else entirely different is interesting.

    • winkybiker

      I can’t really belive that the “right-through” collision most commonly occurs when traffic is backed up. IF traffic is backed up there may be a significantly higher risk, but this is surely a much rarer situation than the generic situation where traffic is not backed up. The absolute number of “right-through” collisions in normal traffic must surely be higher than the number in traffic-backed-up circumstances; for no other reason that normal traffic is much more commonly experienced than backed-up traffic. The city centre may be an exception, but traffic is usually controlled by lights there.

  • Michele

    In all seriousness, I am a little surprised that Sky haven’t already worked out “what type of athlete” Froome is.

    He must be using the UK equivalent of Medicare if he’s going to get the results later in the year.

    Great stuff with Canyon Bikes. That, along with Phinney’s win are great good-news stories.

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