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  • H.E. Pennypacker

    It may be entirely warranted, I don’t know, but I’m starting to get the sense that The Secret Pro maybe doesn’t like Astana all that much… ;-)

    • Jarkko

      Anyone from Astana and anyone spanish.

      But only until they sign for Sky or Orica. Then they become angels.

      • Connor

        He’s not massive fan of Peter K at Sky, that’s for sure…read his Herald Sun commentary. All in all he seems to have his reasons (subjective or otherwise) for his views on other riders. As such, I take his comments as they’re given…no more or less. Interesting that his comments Re: Demare differ markedly from those voiced on the cycling Podcast – which gave a very ineteresting insight into FDJ and the french v Italian elements in the Peloton and Sports press…

      • Ali89

        There’s not much likeable about Astana though.

    • Dave

      He’s just jelly.

    • Stuttgart5

      Does the same rider write all these columns?

  • Alex

    I imagine if you look at all the races The Secret Pro says he’s participated in you narrow down to 5-10 people who he actually is. This is unless of course he’s lying about his participation or it’s actually a group of people, or just made up to begin with.

    • H.E. Pennypacker

      They’ve said from the beginning they include red herrings about race schedule and countless other things to throw people off the trail. If he’s identified, this stops–it’s just that simple. I for one hope that doesn’t happen for a very long time.

      • Alex

        I didn’t read the part about the red herrings. I’ll just assume he’s an Astana rider then :)

        • david__g

          Considering he pretty much never actually says anything anyone else couldn’t deduce or work out, it’s probably just some journo living out their racing fantasy.

            • david__g

              I know. Doesn’t mean we have to believe you.

              • Dave B

                dudes like you just make reading the comments less enjoyable and interesting.

                • david__g

                  I’m not quite sure how that works? You stop liking something because of some random dude’s opinion over who may or may not write it?

                  FWIW I like this column and have no real desire to actually know who it is. And my initial comment was based more on the red herrings comment that perhaps the ultimate red herring is it’s not a pro.

                  Now go and enjoy your awesome free content (nothing is really free) and stop worrying about what I think!

              • One of the things that we’ve discovered throughout the life of this column is that we simply cannot publish some of the profound insights and trash that people want to hear. Sometimes we can, often we can’t. Most of them are unfounded rumours that we need to look into with journalistic checks and balances. And we find that most of them aren’t true. But if you read closely you’ll often find nuggets of gold that we left in there that many people pass by.

                • Jaybo

                  where do i subscribe to the scuttlebutt feed? :D

                • Jmckillop

                  Oh, you mean like that thinly veiled dig at Cancellara’s “engine”?

                  • Abdu

                    Imagine if he really meant it? By that I mean, he’s a former team mate and likes the guy? It’s a very Aussie saying “he’s got a big engine” meaning he can ride (or run) all day. Therefore it has to be Caleb Ewen.

                    • Dave

                      The natural result of having an Aussie ghost writer.

                    • Jmckillop

                      I’m not sure I follow your train of thought. “He’s got a big engine” is not an Aussie saying, it’s fairly common across the English speaking world and beyond. He’s quite clearly saying that Cancellara put in an impressive effort, but that it was nothing compared to what he was doing a few years ago. The implication which follows is that the reason for the difference may be that there is truth in the rumours about Cancellara and mechanical doping.

                    • It is a common expression here in Germany. We call it “einen großen Motor haben.”

                  • J Evans

                    Yup, that was cheap and pathetic – exactly what I’ve come to expect from this column.
                    Originally it was interesting, but now it’s just an excuse for someone who holds almost exactly the same opinions as Greg Henderson to whine.

                    • Dave

                      What’s Henderson been doing recently? He’s been in the news even less than Matt Brammeier.

                  • J Evans

                    The usual cheap shot backed up by nothing.
                    These pieces used to be interesting, but now they’re just rumour-mongering and bias from someone who agrees with everything a certain Antipodean Lotto rider says.

          • Frank Kotter

            I realize you are being argumentative and playing devil’s advocate, but CyclingTips has built a brand on fairness, honesty, professionalism and neutrality. Just to take a name from many, I am pretty confident Shane Stokes would quit the very hour he was involved with a publication which was deceiving its readership.

  • Just a thought… but cameras on bikes could perhaps mean less motars?

    • David9482

      Good possible idea… but I don’t know about you, but I can’t watch a bike race with those cameras. They shake so much, it makes you sick. Plus, it’s a really bad vantage point.

      With that being said, motorbike cameras have things called lenses. It blows me away that media moto’s ever get within 20-30 feet of the riders because the lenses have zoom functions. For those media that don’t know what a zoom function is, it means you have zero reason ever to get close enough for contact with a rider. I’m being very sarcastic, and I apologise, but the fewer the motorbikes the better.

      • velocite

        Except that from the spectator’s point of view the more camera motos the better – and if you’re depending on a long lens to get close you’re restricted to a front or rear view only. No close ups of derailleurs or injuries, for example. Robbie McEwen on a moto during the Cadel Evans race was terrific, I thought. More moto ettiquette, more rider skill and more rider vetting is the way to go, no?

        • marcus_moore

          A lot of the moto riders are gendarme / motorbike cops rolling through the bunch to close the side roads – hence the number of bikes going through the bunch.
          That being said, the number of motos around Kuznetsov while he was solo on Gent-Wevelgem was over the top.

          • velocite

            I’ve neither been in nor organized a road race, so this is an armchair idea. But insofar as gendarme motos clearly do need to routinely leapfrog the peleton in a rolling road closure, should there be more formality in the process by which this occurs? For example, if the peleton passing opportunity is necessarily difficult, could the race be neutralized in some way? The problem would of course be the maintenance of gaps. Or some kind of audible signal for the duration of the manoevre?

            • De Mac

              There are only limited numbers of police motos and a LOT of crossroads / intersections passed during professional bike races, which means they will always have to leap-frog the peloton, they use their horns / sirens, but the number of peloton-passes obviously increases risk.

              • velocite

                I understand that. I was suggesting that the possibility of introducing a formal protocol for the leapfrogging process. For example signal the start and end of each leapfrog, so that within the defined period the peleton leaves room for it and it cab be accomplished quickly and safely.

                • De Mac

                  I get what you’re saying and it does make sense, but the dynamics of a race – breakaways, split-bunches, team cars, race officials, medicos, cameras, etc on the road might not permit such formal measures, or enable them to be ‘timed.’

                • Dave

                  It unfortunately needs to be done almost constantly, to seal off every little side street.

                  Well-organised races already proactively regulate traffic coming through when it is known that there’s a wider road coming up soon.

                • Abdu

                  Absolutely, good idea. At the race start, the Motos are briefed and issued maps showing the red zones where they can’t overtake. Add that to a maximum speed when overtaking.

      • Robert Merkel

        Not that this justifies putting riders at risk to get a shot…but you can’t exactly replicate the effects of getting close to your subject by shooting from further away with a telephoto lens.

        See this site for a (non-cycling) explanation:

        https://www.slrlounge.com/lens-compression/

    • Connor

      Nice! An elegant and simple solution….probably would give a better viewing experience too.

      • Dave

        Late night programming featuring a screen full of scantily-covered buttocks would be something that SBS has plenty of previous experience with.

    • jules

      Make the motos wear lycra only. Cruel but effective

      • Dave

        We could make it entry #38 on the list of problems that can be improved with the liberal application of a taser.

  • Alex Mgy

    i’am always surprised with the secret pro by the tendency he has to excuse some people and to accuse others. What about the riders who said Demare didn’t cheat? Nibali’s a cheater but not all of his friends who were present during the armstrong’s years, come on. Stop being secret, come public. It’s nice to tell us what there is behind the curtain but it’s to easy to make this kind of statements, i still like Lotto-Soudal but…

    • Remember, we were the ones to ask him to write for us under anonymity. He didn’t come to us begging to hide behind this pseudonym so he could call out other riders. It’s easier to just keep your mouth shut and mind your own business when you’re a professional athlete. This gives you a backseat into what someone in the peloton is thinking. Take it for what it is…

      • Alex Mgy

        Yes of course i know how it works, it’s just the opinion of one person, i respect that. My point is that he’s more and more foolish and incoherent. The tone he uses is patronizing.

      • Ladders

        Hope the Secret Pro(s) will write a book when he retires (unless he plans on being a DS etc) and tells us more about the stuff he can’t tell us at the moment! Great stuff, keep up the good work!

    • jules

      It’s a rider’s perspective. It’s subjective, it’s meant to be. You’re missing the point when you try to critique his perspective. It’s accurate – by definition.

      • Neal Rogers

        Exactly

      • philipmcvey

        I agree up to the part ‘accurate by definition’. Surely it’s neither accurate nor inaccurate by definition. Accurate by definition would imply that this was 100% objective and empirical when it is in fact wholly subjective. We can’t know how much is accurate and how much isn’t. From that we can use our own apply our own gut feelings and biases (positive and negative) to decide on what to believe and what to disregard. In short, it’s pointless but often great fun… read it, don’t read it.. but don’t expect it to be a factual record.

      • ebbe

        Accurate as in: This is indeed his opinion. Though this opinion is not necessarily factually accurate, which potentially invalidates the opinion. Validity is always more important than accuracy: Being largely right is better than being precisely wrong.

        And – now here’s the real damaging issue – this whole thing is terribly unbalanced as well. If there is one ethic journalism should always adhere to, it is the ethic of fair balance: Always show multiple sides of the same story. Journalism without fair balance is not journalism, it’s propaganda and/or marketing.

        It’s fine to get people to write “columns” voicing their opinions (anonymous columns are questionable, but OK), but then you’re supposed to have multiple columnists with opinions that oppose and/or complement each other, so your readers can still construct a somewhat complete view on the issues at hand. That’s journalism 101.

    • Chris

      It’s almost like it’s a single person’s opinion, isn’t it? How odd.

  • Peter

    Pretty cowardly accusing someone of cheating hiding behind anonymity.

    • Raymond

      Indeed. I thought this article on Inrng summed up the situation pretty well:

      http://inrng.com/2016/03/demare-cipressa-conspiracy-theories/

      • marcus_moore

        I was also quite comfortable with Inrng’s summation & the fact that there’s so many other vehicles around that it’s virtually impossible to travel very far at speed holding on to the one vehicle.
        Even if the car did get Demare on to the back of the bunch, he still had to get from the back to the front of the bunch while going over the Cipressa and Poggio – no easy feat in itself!

        • Frank Kotter

          I’m a fit rider. If I am way off the back of the pack on a long, shallow climb and get a 30 second tow up to the back of the group at speed, I will be in the front 1/3 with little effort. Yeah, it’s not a delivery to the front per se, but it is a huge benefit to be able to take a break when all others are going at 110%.

    • pedr09

      Not if you or others you trust saw it first hand. Also, this guy is supposed to be anonymous, that’s the whole point…. The anonymity provides the insights otherwise not available. Whether you agree with them or not is irrelevant.

    • Remember, we ask him to write for us under anonymity. He didn’t come to us begging to hide behind this pseudonym so he could call out other riders. It’s easier to just keep your mouth shut and mind your own business when you’re a professional athlete. This gives you a backseat into what someone in the peloton is thinking. Take it for what it is.

    • velocite

      I believe you’ve missed the point of TSP.

    • donncha

      Amazing how everyone saw Démare hanging on yet not one single photo from one of the key points of the race has been produced….

      • The photographers on motorbikes usually need to be ahead of the race, and the other photographers would have been racing their way around the course to the finish at that point. But with social media these days, it’s surprising we haven’t seen anything. Cosmo has some good insights from the TV footage on the day: https://cyclingtips.com/2016/03/how-the-race-was-won-2016-milan-san-remo/

        • Name

          Why not put official cameras in/on all race/team vehicals? That way disputes like this could easily verified one way or another. I would also think such cameras would deter sticky bottles and other such shadiness.

      • J Evans

        Nor has a single spectator said anything.
        Or anyone else in a team car.
        Nor any other riders.
        Fact is, there is nowhere near the evidence to proclaim it in such a cut and dried manner.
        And ask yourself why these two decided to break cycling’s famed omerta.
        No answers: just questions.

        • Frank Kotter

          But in all fairness, was there any photo produced of Nib’s ride other than that wide angle from the helicopter? If not for that one picture, would he have been ‘caught’? And, let’s face it, they weren’t even trying to hide that one!

          • J Evans

            We don’t know. There was no need for phots because we’d all seen it on TV.
            Would the other riders have said something? Also a don’t know.
            And spectators? With all the social media around and everyone carrying a camera, it is odd that not one other person has come forward.

            • Frank Kotter

              I’ve watched some pro races, also taken photos of those races. Never took a photo of the back of the peloton. Also at the end of a one day race, there is very little attention for the back of the peloton as if you are there, you are of little importance. It is different in this respect to a grand tour.

              Yeah, that’s exactly why we are still talking about it…. evidence that he did get a tow, the fact there is no hard evidence of it AND that he won.

    • Connor

      Is your name actually ‘Peter’ Peter?

    • SUFFERvision1

      If you look at time gaps in the Strava data vs. the lead group I don’t see evidence for a tow:

      http://labs.strava.com/flyby/viewer/#521963982?c=spv933h1&z=F&t=1MxMh2&a=zokcH-xKGx8eyyQfm9QlHw&x=hJ-_&y=r

      Demare held the gap steady at around 35 seconds until about 1/4 of the way up the climb when he started to bring them back a little. But see 1:30:30 in this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=feNYD7IM89E) for what the leaders looked like at that point. The gap came in because the leaders sat up, not because Demare sped up, and indeed, the commentators were talking about the slow pace.

      Demare lost a little time as the leaders finished reeling in the break. Then he brought back most of the remaining gap at the top of the climb where the grade eases up, and, again, the leaders eased up after the bend at 23.3km to go before Visconti attacks without response. If you look at Strava files for guys who *did* share power (e.g., Kwiatkowski, de Kort), their power from this point to the top was only 85% of their power for the climb so far.

      Nowhere in Demare’s Strava data does he stop pedalling on the Cipressa, with the exception of 1 or 2 seconds in bends.

      • Keep in mind that Demare’s original strava file was pulled and then re-uploaded.

        • Chris

          Damn you, auto upload!

        • jules

          That was highly suspicious. “The numbers will vindicate me! Obviously I’d better remove them in a panic.”

        • Neal Rogers

          And that he’s not released his power data, although he was using a power meter.

          • hornk

            Does he normally share his power data, or are we just throwing shade his way for fun?

            • Neal Rogers

              Somewhat irrelevant whether he’s shared power data in the past or not; he hasn’t before had a victory at a monument brought into question. This is unique situation. Fact is, he has the power data, and sharing it, if even just for the section from the crash to the top of the Poggio, would almost certainly exonerate him. Or implicate him. He’s chosen not to release it.

              • Fieldsprint

                This is just common sense. Imagine for a moment you just won a monument — you’re first one. Effin’ Milan San Remo! And someone has the balls to accuse you of cheating. Wouldn’t uploading your power data be the FIRST thing you do to shut up the haters? C’mon now.

    • Steve S

      Jeez, the guy takes a risk to give us info and insight we wouldn’t normally get to read and you call him that. Of course he’s anonymous, it’s his career at stake here. How do you think he’s going to get on in the peloton after reporting bad behaviour and suspected PED use? Do you think Sky will offer him a lucrative contract for next season after his comments about Peter Kennaugh last month?

      For the record, you’re anonymous right now. Even if Peter is your real name and you added your surname, you can post what you like and there’s no repercussions. No one is going to fire you or not help you out in your next race, no one would care… unless you’re actually Peter Kennaugh and are looking for revenge, LOL

      Be grateful to him.

      • Peter

        Risk? Pah

        If only The Secret Bro could risk sharing their evidence re “We have Strava data that shows him freewheeling at 50kph or thereabouts”.

        I’ll never be grateful for someone accusing another without any evidence. Y’know justice and all that.

      • Neuron1

        And if he really wanted to be really honest he would have spoken out when The two other riders did,immediately after MSR. You have lost your window of credibility TSP.

  • GoRixter

    Not being at all familiar with how insurance works in the Pro Peleton, could car and motorbike riders carry insurance, such that if they cause an accident resulting in a rider injury, that rider is AUTOMATICALLY compensated for the amount of time he’s unable to race. Obviously for the pro riders it’s their livelihood, not a casual hobby. If I got injured at work and couldn’t, I would get insurance coverage that I and my employer pay into for such an event. Again sorry if I’m way off track or if this has already been covered. Just my $.02 worth…

    • Andy B

      whos going to take on that risk?

      • GoRixter

        That would be a requirement for driver/vehicle participating in a race, be it media, medic, support, etc. No liability insurance, no participation

    • Dave

      In the two professional divisions, riders are paid a retainer rather than fees per race. Unless their agent has rolled over and accepted a contract with a low retainer and performance incentives to make up the rest, they won’t lose anything.

      The teams would have insurance policies to cover injuries – the majority of which are just a part of bike racing and not car/moto-assisted. The team would leave it up to their insurer to decide whether to go after the race organiser’s insurance or not.

  • Lach

    I love these articles *hi fives*

  • Neuron1

    A few comments are warranted. TSP’s obvious hatred for Vincenzo Nibali, Astana and all things Italian is so clearly obvious and he uses every opportunity to express it. He attacks Nibali personally, not for professional reasons. I watch every race, repeatedly and can say that there are many, many instances of car holding or motor pacing in every race. Tour 2014, stage 5 Froome and company rode behind the Sky car for several minutes following his first crash. Porte had done the same on stage 2. The driver of the car motions to RP to fall back behind the vehicle to get assistance. Contador, following his crash on stage 11, holds on to the medical car and or his team car for a total of several minutes. Giro 2015, AC gets a timely push as he is tiring at the top on Monte Ologno on stage 18. Froome’s illegal feed in Tour 2013 changed the outcome of the race. Dimension Data at the Tour de Langkawi 2016 blocking the Astana car from getting to the race leader after a mechanical, while DD attacked. Just a few examples of blatant cheating. But hey, they are teams from UK or former UK colonies, it’s all-okay.

    • Abdu

      Imagine if The Secret Pro was actually Italian…?

    • ebbe

      Yep, much Anglo-Saxon pride and prejudice going on with TSP, and in fact on Cyclingtips in general. I’ve started taking everything written here about non-english speakers with a big bag of salt.

      Interestingly, in Europe we’re not anti-Anglo-Saxon at all, even though one of the worst cheats ever was the American who shall not be named ;-)

  • Neuron1

    Regarding the EWP being used at TA: If you are going to use a test case to show your protocol works, at least make sure the conditions are at least even remotely dangerous, not bright and sunny for the entire route. Otherwise you look like fools. Ironically and tragically, all of the deaths and major injuries in bike racing in the past few years have occurred in perfect weather conditions. I’ve not read about one instance of heat stroke, frostbite or other weather related untoward outcome.

  • Neuron1

    Matt Brammeier, journeyman cyclist and midpack cannon fodder is not a rider anyone should be listening to. The closest he will ever get to cycling greatness is riding behind a real champion, like Nibali, Contador, Sagan, Kristoff, Cancellara, Boonen and numerous others who wouldn’t notice either his presence or absence in the peloton. His bike handling skills and palmares are woefully inadequate. His crash at the Tour of Utah, saved his life. Had the car not been there he would have gone over the cliff and likely died. Watch the video! Greg Van Avermat should have been sanctioned for his use of IV Vaminolact, along with a number of other Belgian riders, but once again rules are malleable. Jens Debusschere slamming the rider from Roompot into the barriers at the Flanders championship and breaking his leg was sportsmanship at the highest level. But since you likely ride for Lotto…

    • Superpilot

      You’re telling the TSP not to judge, and then go on a full on judge fest of Brammeier, along with a decent string of your own accusations here. These are your opinion. He is providing his own. You don’t have to agree, in fact that is what makes these articles interesting, differing opinons. If you’d like a non-biased, non judgemental piece, I’m sure there are multiple sites around with some nice copy-pasted press releases to read. If you want to read some thought provoking content that may not follow your own train of thought, and you’re able to take it on board and rationally outlay your own opinions if they differ, and with a bit of humour, you should stick around.

      • Neuron1

        I’m saying that TSP uses this as a bully pulpit to attack those he doesn’t like yet ignores those same actions in those he does. He has called for the riders to stick together on the EWP, as if they should march in lockstep. I’m all for rider safety, but it’s tough to defend canceling the TA stage when the route was clear. Nibali didn’t attack other riders for the cancellation, the attacks on him were unwarranted. He suggested altering the route and provided alternatives. There were numerous Sky riders out with a GI bug earlier this season, he didn’t call them out as dopers like he did Aru. I like his inside scoop, just not the personal attacks.

      • ebbe

        Neuron1 is not calling TSP out on the opinions of TSP. He’s calling TSP out on hypocrisy. #teamNeuron1

    • david__g

      From the responses to his tweet about Nibali and the weather (and other tweets in general) Brammier actually seems to be pretty pally and popular with much of the peloton, including many of the big names. I mean, whatever though, he dissed your favourite and now you’re MAD, right?

      • Neuron1

        I’m not mad. In fact I did not put anything except names or abbreviations in capitol letters, signifying anger. Nibali is one of many riders, on numerous team I root for, including BMC, OGE, Lotto, Trek, OPS, and yes even Sky, etc. It depends on the race. Brammeier (proper spelling) should have been much more politically astute. His tweet did not need to get personal, nor did TSP. He, MB, seems to be taking a political stand, but he picked the wrong stage and the wrong race to make it, IMHO. They should have chosen not to ride the PN stage on which it was snowing prior to the start, that would have made sense. Cancelling the TA stage changed the entire complexion and outcome of a major race without really making any points.

      • ebbe

        Brammeier got support from riders who clearly benefitted (either personally or via a team mate) from that stage being cancelled. Other riders (Surprise surprise: Climbers that were eyeing that stage for a good result) have said they were not happy with the cancellation, or at least would have liked an alternative stage.

  • Neuron1

    And finally, calling out Demare for catching a tow in MSR is disingenuous. I believe TSP did this for 3 reasons: 1) If Demare isn’t there for the sprint, an English bloke gets the victory, 2) It makes TSP look like he is not an anti-Italian bigot and 3) FDJ wanted to race on the cancelled stage of TA. Thus, he can kill 3 birds with one stone.

    If the riders union wants to take a stand, stand up about the motorcycle and car issue. Say they won’t race again until there is a reasonable plan put in place to minimize risk. That however would require real spine. I call on TSP and his team to stand up on this. Alas, they will not. He hides behind his nom de plume and takes shots at people he doesn’t like. Real man and professionals do not act this way.

    • Superpilot

      That’s your opinion of his opinion. There’s no points to be won here.

    • Michele

      I need a to have a lay down after reading your 4 points.

      I’m now not sure if TSP is pro or anti Italian. He appears to be UK-based or from a country that was once under Commonwealth Rule [aside from Tinkoff].

      I think he rides for Lotto, but then again he might just be Belgian, since he is obviously pro them and anti-Dutch. We could dig even further and determine if he’s Flandrian or French Speaking. Probably from Flanders because he teed off on Demare.

      My head hurts.

    • J Evans

      All four comments spot on. The Secret Greg Henderson likes to throw around shit, but the facts don’t back up what he says.

      • ebbe

        Which is a shame, since I really am a massive fan of Greg Henderson for what he’s achieved and his race attitude… Just not of the backhanded personal attacks on non-english speakers by TSP. If the two are indeed the same person, that would equate to some time warping black hole singularity in my head ;-)

  • Neuron1

    Back in 2013 TSP reported that a GT winner was going down for Biological Passport violations. Did this occur?

    • jules

      Yes

      • Neuron1

        Who?

        • jules

          Menchov

          • Neuron1

            Ah yes, retroactive testing. Great pick up. Thanks.

          • Neuron1

            It’s a good thing Andy and the rest of the top ten riders were clean.

            • jules

              Yes, the new clean generation. No doubt..

  • Berne Shaw

    Making Motos safer. No more team cars. All repairs bikes medical come from small number of neutral support cars. No more sticky bottle or drafting this way. Special radios for all riders. Not a channel to teams but special,safety channel so everyone told of dangers crashes ahead. If rider in trouble neutral car comes to aid. Fewer cycles that keep a distance by using stabilized camera gimbal and telephoto lenses. Doors not require a rider in addition to driver. Remote controlled.

  • Tom

    I am surprised with the comment ‘Let’s begin with the most pressing issue of the day, race motorbikes’, I would have thought terrorism would be top of my list!
    SP seems to forget how the money that allows him to race, arrives in his bank account. No bikes, no photos/footage, no sponsorship, no race, no money or job…
    It is also clear that he wasn’t at this race, so I have ascribed, didn’t witness it, so how can you comment on the specifics here?

    I think an issue, and has been talked a lot by many, including SP, is the culture in the peloton now, younger kids, with no respect for traditions etc, doing stupid things on bikes. The moto’s and cars have been around for decades, what has changed?

    As much as Matthews espoused sour grapes over his loss, the omertà is secure, clear to see that, as we all agree, there would have been footage of Demare hanging on, no one is prepared to come forward, lest they were in a similar position.

    • boalio

      So people should just get hit by motorbikes and be grateful that they are getting paid? In any other profession the owners/organisers would probably be facing criminal charges for an unsafe workplace.

  • Andy B

    Sergey?

    • Pepito Sbazzeguti

      Both Lagutin and Van Poppel are good candidates…

  • Larry @CycleItalia

    I like the Secret Pro feature but must admit to getting a bit tired of his xenophobia. The sport’s chock-full of “dirty, rotten, cheaters” but amazingly none of them ever seem to be Australians, though the lists of dope cheats over the years has the names of a few boys from OZ, no?

    • Douglas Macarthy

      no we don t cheat just work hard

      • Larry @CycleItalia

        Yeah, sure….where have we heard claims like that before?

  • J Evans

    The usual nonsense.

    The weather isn’t the ‘danger’ the UCI should have been dealing with, as we’ve now learned.

    The weather forecast that Vegni apparently saw differed from all the other forecasts.

    An alternative route is almost always offered, but not that day.

    You decide on the day, not the day before, because forecasts are not reliable.

    As for Démare, no evidence, just the usual rumour-mongering from tsp.

    The strava data shows him freewheeling on a downhill section, but that sort of detail doesn’t usually bother tsp.

    Watch Cosmo’s video and Démare is up about 30 seconds before Matthews following the crash.

    I’m not saying he didn’t take a tow – like tsp, I don’t know – I’m saying there’s no evidence other than two blokes say they saw it.

    Yates’s top speed was higher than Démare’s up the hill and Démare wasn’t the only rider to beat Visconti – many probably did, but they don’t all load their data on strava. One person who definitely did was the mountain goat Ian Stannard, who got over the top in front of Visconti.

  • Dave

    Bets on how long this one stays up?

    Somewhere a few hours shorter than the time Cadel had the yellow jersey in 2011 is my guess.

  • dave

    the secret pro comes across a bit of a cunt

  • treb’

    Why does not everyone AGREE with my point of view ? It’s though the one I am almost always in accord with

  • dave

    the whole secret pro concept is quite cowardly, anyone can make allegations behind a cloak of anonymity. If it’s fake it’s pretty disgraceful, if it’s real whoever’s opinion it is should either be brave enough to voice it in public, otherwise they should keep their opinions to themselves. Rosa Parks went and sat on a bus to make a point, she didn’t write anonymous blogs. If you have a legitimate problem with people in cycling or cycling itself don’t snipe at them/it the safety of the internet.

    • J Evans

      Last time he was ‘brave enough to voice it in public’ the other guy threatened to sue him (don’t know if that’s still ongoing).
      Frankly, this column is pathetic. Cowardly, tabloid garbage based on nothing, but the biases of one person who seems to believe everything he hears.

      • Dave

        > Last time he was ‘brave enough to voice it in public’ the other guy threatened to sue him

        Quite rightly, in that case.

        • J Evans

          True. And I hope it comes to court.

          • Dave

            Considering the chance of him settling the issue with a public apology is very slim, it could well get there.

            How on earth does he manage to fit his helmet on every day?

      • Mark Robinson

        “This column is pathetic…..” Good, so I can safely assume I never have to read your BTL comments here again?

  • Will

    little dig as Spartacus there insinuating maybe a motor a few years back…. haha

  • Paul

    Moto pilot seems like a good job for an ex pro if they’ve got nothing better to do? At least they’d know how the peloton is moving and could anticipate when to go and when to stay.

  • Stuttgart5

    Very important point – current terrorism is not the result of a religious war. It is the result of hegemony, repression and counter attack. Muslims organize themselves through their religion, and most Arabs are Muslim, This terrorism didn’t exist until recently even though the religions have existed for a very long time. This is not a religious war. It has more to do with oil and exploitation.

    • Peter

      OT but you have to ask yourself why are Islamists killing non-Islamist Muslims? Why aren’t groups from Latin America (re ‘America’s Backyard’, ‘Operation Condor’, ‘Dirty War’) killing people on the streets in the US? Where are all the killers from the exploited sub-Saharan African countries blowing up parts of Europe? Etc, etc…

    • Nicky McG

      What about the Charlie Hebdo attacks or the murder of Theo Van Gogh or the fatwa (and several attempts to murder) against Salman Rushdie?

  • DISQUS

    Nibali is a d-bag, but Cadel-don’t touch my stuffy-Evans is a champ? Same number of TdF wins between the two of them.

  • Pepito Sbazzeguti

    And The Secret Pro is… Boy Van Poppel.

  • Pepito Sbazzeguti

    Boy Van Poppel

  • T R English

    Another good one from Michael Rogers!

  • Alfa4

    Are you going to say something to SKY to sign Mikel Landa. For you was a doper. I know how talented is that man. I hope you change your mind.

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