feat
  • Discussion thread #1: When was the last time we saw an edition of Paris-Roubaix as exciting and memorable as this one?

    • Winky

      Never. Best I’ve seen.

    • Ragtag

      Never

    • Michele

      On TV never.

      But I went a couple of years ago and saw it live in the flesh. Even got to the velodrome in time to see Fabian and Sep do a track stand before a two-up sprint.

      This year’s race was better, But you can’t beat being there in the flesh :)

    • RWH

      Can’t say that I’ve seen a better P-R, I love the complexity of the race with the lack of the one dimensionality of many races

    • philipmcvey

      This is the best I’ve seen (though I’ve not seen that many). What always amazes me about this race is that a long, essentially straight, flat slog through the anonymous and windswept fields and small towns of northern France can conjure up so much drama year after year. Sure, the cobbles are extremely tough but they only make up 20% of the route. It proves you don’t need stunning Alpine vistas and huge climbs to create great racing; what you DO need is a significant number of guys ready to throw it all down for one day. I can’t think of another race where so many commit so completely. Stunning advertisement for the sport of road cycling.

  • Discussion thread #2: Imanol Erviti: a genuine contender at the Classics in the years to come?

    • Tyron Anton

      Too early to say, he doesn’t necessarily have the team to support in him the classics but then neither did Hayman this year.

      • If anything, Hayman was riding in support of Keukeleire!

    • marcus_moore

      Erviti will be a contender but not if he stays with Movistar – he needs teammates up there with him at some point

  • Discussion thread #3: Ever seen a better bike-handler than Peter Sagan?

    • Winky

      Nope. Of course not.

    • Ragtag

      No. He is miles above everyone.

    • Dave

      Nibali is better on the descents because he carries better exit speed, but nobody beats Sagan when it comes to handling the more unexpected stuff.

      • Michele

        Agree 100% – emphasis on the “unexpected stuff”.

    • RWH

      The fact he stayed upright when Cancellara went down is a minor miracle!

      • And everyone else behind him also went down.

    • philipmcvey

      In road cycling no. If the anecdotes are true he was pretty special when he raced cross country – even though he broke a spectacular number of frames. One story is that he rolled up to a round of his national XC championships on his sister’s supermarket-bought comfort bike (he’d sold his race bike the week before) and won in a canter.

    • Velloydy

      Yes, and he even rides of Orica GreenEdge… sort of. Nino Schurter has an amazing array or results on the XC MTB to his name including World Championships and World Cups and his handling is amazing and even a level above someone like Julian Absalon who has been a god of XC MTB for a decade. And Nino pulled on the Orica GreenEdge jersey for a couple of races last year (Tours of Suisse and Romandie) thanks to his common sponsor in Scott. But Sagan is pretty special, so lets call is a draw :)

  • Discussion thread #4: What is Sky’s best chance of winning a Monument? Liege-Bastogne-Liege? Il Lombardia? Next year’s Spring Classics?

    • Winky

      Hard to say. They seem to be able to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory in very many ways. A “Speith-like” performance on Sunday.

      • claude cat

        Arguably Etixx fail, with seemingly much better classic’s squads!
        As for Sky, Kwiatkowski gives them pretty good shot at LBL I think.

    • Ragtag

      To be frank it will be tough for them. SKY is just too clinical and try to race very methodically. Whereas it is my belief the classics are won by riders with the most grit, sheer determination and emotion. At least to us viewers it seems to be driven by passion and somehow looking at SKY it seems that is missing in their racing. It’s always numbers and math. I think there is a romantic side to cycle racing and SKY has not cracked that part yet.

      • Superpilot

        I don’t want to defend them, they are computers in the tours, but Stannards wins in Omloop in the rain and foul weather goes against that. He got a deserved 3rd this year in PR, but was one of the few riders I saw asking for poor forecasts to help his chances, which goes against predictability, and towards grinta.

        • Dave

          Stannard’s wins in the semi-classics have been about as much to do with the team as Sagan’s and Erviti’s rides at Roubaix.

          • Superpilot

            Yep, but it shows they have the capability within the team to win one-day races, and not all of them are fair weather robots, right?

    • Superpilot

      They had 5 together, it was bad luck they lost 3. It was in their hands, I turned to my mate and said as much, they were set up perfectly. And I’m not a Sky fan. Only riding on mud then dry surface directly after, sliding much like Cancellara, caused those crashes. It was bad luck rather than tactical error, as other teams have done this season. G was probably their greatest chance, and he is off to the stage races, so until they concentrate everything onto the classics, it’ll be unlikely or just lucky.

      • singlespeedscott

        Is it really bad luck? Referring to a recent blog post by Steve Tilford – http://stevetilford.com/2016/04/05/riding-in-team-formation-is-idiotic/ teams are spending to much of their time clumped together in the peleton. Spread everyone around and come together when required that way you don’t lose everyone due to one crash. That way you have guys at the front to push the pace and guys at the back to bring back the fallen.

        • Superpilot

          Yes the BMC crash in the classics is a ‘classic’ example of that. But getting riders through protected works ala what Martin did for Boonen (and a bunch of others). I look at teams who should be doing better (Cannondale, Astana) and they were all over the shop, as you suggest, and with no results really. But also no – losing traction in a corner on 2 separate occasions is bad luck/bad handling skill more than bad tactics. IMHO, YMMV.

    • Morten Reippuert Knudsen

      Bribery

  • Discussion thread #5: How did you rate Tony Martin’s performance on Sunday? Classics contender in his own right or a workhorse for his teammates?

    • Ragtag

      Contender.

    • Superpilot

      If he can get to the final without having fired the cannons for teammates instead, definitely contender for solo break victory. Otherwise, he’s a potent teammate, he was mesmerising!

    • Tyron Anton

      He’s improperly used. He could win the classics if the team was structured around him. Hold him back until Carrefour de l’Arbre and then let him blow the field apart.

    • claude cat

      Just a monster.

    • RWH

      Absolute contender in P-R when he gets his chance, he was the apprentice to Boonen’s master this year

    • philipmcvey

      Definite contender to win Paris-Roubaix once Boonen retires. Having power in the bank at the end of the race seems to be a big factor in winning it rather than outright speed and he puts out more power than a small nuclear reactor.

    • Dave

      Contender. But he needs to go to a team which has a clue about race tactics!

    • JBS

      Tony Martin would’ve been a contender on Sunday…if he had Tony Martin as a team mate.

  • Discussion thread #6: Where to from here for Sep Vanmarcke? Will he be able to take his breakthrough win with the likes of Sagan only getting better? If so, how?

    • claude cat

      Who is he going to ride for next year?

      • Superpilot

        Trek must be in the market for him? Pales in comparison to Fabs tho

        • claude cat

          Or BMC?

        • Dave

          He would be a half decent consolation prize for Trek if they can’t get Sagan.

      • ebbe

        Lotto Jumbo is offering him a new contract. They’re certainly not the richest team, but they really want to keep him and he really wants to stay. So it looks like he’ll be staying there for now.

        • Dave

          I won’t be surprised if he waits until transfer season before signing on the dotted line. It would be worth seeing what’s out there even if he does eventually stick with LottoNL.

          At the least, it might prompt the team to try a bit harder to give him a better offer, perhaps dropping a couple of riders to trim their squad from 28 to 25-26 like Orica did to keep the Yates brothers.

          • ebbe

            Yeah, that’s what a smart manager would recommend ;-) Even so, reports in Dutch media are that they are already talking seriously about an extension, and that both parties are confident that they want to continue and will reach an agreement. That’s all I know ;-) Of course, somebody else can always come up with a better offer and snatch Sep away, or Seps manager could push things a bit to get a better offer, but that’s not how it looks. This is of course limited to what is known in the media right now.

            Problem with dropping riders is that Lotto Jumbo has had a rider shortage for several months last year. Because they had already dropped a few contract, but then some guys became injured, they’ve actually had to hire in “temps” from other (non-WT) teams to be able to ride some races. At least one guy who rode with them the season before but was cut had to come back temporarily. Moreover, they also need people (different people mostly) to support their mountain guys. Any which way, I can imagine running a team with – compared to the richer teams, but also compared to their own team in the Rabobank years – no money at all has to be a big challenge. It’s strange in a way, since NL is quite a rich country with lots of big multinational companies. The other Dutch team (although on a German license) Giant Alpecin has similar issues this year, after that group accident. Maybe they both need to hire a better sponsor-networker first of all. Money makes the wheels go round, after all.

            • Dave

              I don’t know what you’re talking about with this talk of hiring ‘temps’ as that is outside of the WorldTour rules. You might be confusing it with the practice of giving unsigned U23 riders a trial run as a ‘stagiare’ in a lower ranked race during the August-November period.

              If Lotto-Jumbo have shortages despite having signed 28 riders, they must be overextending themselves with a heavy race program. If they cut back on some of the minor races, they shouldn’t have a problem getting by with 24-25 riders.

              A slightly smaller team competing in fewer races but getting better results should be more attractive to sponsors than a large team entering more races and getting mediocre results.

              • ebbe

                Don’t know how they did it, but they did. Maybe these guys were officially still under contract but were just not supposed to ride a big program? I don’t exactly know, but at least one of them was certainly not an U23 rider. Others could have been. Maybe they managed to get an exemption? Point is: They had to bring in extra guys since they were under-manned after the combination of cutting riders from the seasons before and many injured/ill elite riders.

                Sure, they might be “overextending” (as you put it) but that’s the whole point, isn’t it? They want to, or the sponsor wants them to, ride certain races. For that, they will need a certain roster, which means potential winners + support. One classics guy + support guys, a few GC/mountain guys + support guys, a few sprinters + support guys = easily 28 (of which 4 or 5 are U23, and after the Giro eti will retire, so that’s one down) riders. And let’s be honest, last year most of their wins came from the sprinters first, then the GC/mountain guys, and none in classics: https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Team_LottoNL-Jumbo/2015 – So it seems taking away support from the sprinters and GC/mountain guys isn’t the smartest thing to do.

                Now I’m a big fan of Sep and was obviously rooting for him all day. Could Sep finally get a classics win if he would get better support? Possibly. On the other hand, the other 4 riders in the last remaining head group were isolated from support as well… And the team with best overall support (Etixx) has not won their big races so far this season either.

                The issue comes down to this: Since Lotto Jumbo team’s budget is very limited, more support and/or money for Sep (not winning races) would cut deeply into the support for other guys (who are actually winning races). These guys already had underperforming support last season. The team has already made the conscious choice to give up on results in ‘smaller’ races (which is a big sacrifice from the support guys – since those smaller races are their chances to shine), so concessions were already made. Tough decision to make even more compromises, when you still want to have your winning riders win a sprint or mountain stage every now and then, or Kelderman and/or Gesink have a real shot at finishing top 10 in a grand tour.

    • Michele

      There are no certainties in cycling, but I can see him winning P-R one day. And if the right circumstances present themselves, then maybe even Ronde too.

      The wind conditions didn’t really suit Sep for his double-attack on Carrefour. That said, and as highlighted in HTRWW, the cobbles on the Gruson sector are shocking. They are as bad as the two sectors that proceed it.

      If that section was fenced off and riders couldn’t race along the concrete/cement edges, someone like Sep could take further advantage of that.

      His bike handling / cornering on the cobbled sections was amazing to watch – I don’t think there’s anyone in the peloton who is as good racing flat out over cobbles – Sagan included [Though Sep would never be able to avoid a crash like Sagan did]. That’s 2 years now [the other was in 2013] where he had proven best over the pave, only to not win the race.

    • philipmcvey

      Still only 27 – he’s got time to hone his racing brain I guess. I loved the way he rode the last part of P-R. He gave it everything, but the combination of the other four was just enough to pull him back. On another day they may not have had enough collective energy or wouldn’t have worked as well together. He can definitely win P-R if everything falls in to place.

    • Dave

      Sep needs a bit more in his tool box than just riding the cobbles well. That might be good for some of the continental-ranked races in this part of the season and perhaps occasionally a semi-classic, but not for the quality races that the big names are targeting.

  • Discussion thread #7: Tom Boonen: unlucky to get boxed in in that final sprint?

    • Winky

      I’ve never seen 5 more knackered riders. I don’t think anyone was able to put together a plan for the sprint.

    • Ragtag

      He did seemed lost. I don’t think he had given the other four a real chance even till that point.

    • blimit

      Tom looked dog tired & appeared to ‘let’ Matt dictate the sprint.
      Checkout his smile of genuine pleasure as Matt hoists the cobble (12:54)

    • Michele

      I think Tom “lost” the race when EBH and Stannard re-joined at the started of the final lap.
      He wasn’t unlucky to get boxed in, the presence of a 4th rider complicated matters for him, but he made the positioning mistake that resulted in 2 riders impeding his sprint. Understandable mistake to make when you’re probably exhausted.
      By the time he got free, it was all too late.
      I reckon if it was a 2-up or even 3-up mistake he *probably* would have won.

    • Andy B

      unlucky yes but that’s racing!

    • Superpilot

      Definitely, if he even was on the outside of Hayman, he had greater speed on the straight and would of had it. Hayman rode it perfectly from the front, sprinted earliest of them all. Was the worst move tactically to be at the front at that point, normally you would get rolled by any stronger riders behind, but SVM and Stannard were too tired, and by rolling up beside Tom one after the other, just penned Tom in for longer, and helped Haymans bid. Was great to watch, and we were just dumbfounded that Hayman led it all out for pretty much half a lap and kept it!

      • Dave

        It wasn’t an early sprint which won it for Hayman, he was the last one to start his sprint.

        It was his track experience which won it, while Boonen was soft pedalling on the inside of the first turn Hayman was picking up energy on the very top of the banking. His gravity-aided acceleration on the back straight made them react and sprint early, which in turn meant he could use his head start to sprint later and make sure he had enough to go to the line. Vanmarcke did box in Boonen, but the only person Boonen can blame for his choice to claim the sprinter’s lane is himself.

        Gaining height and attacking about 250m out is a legit tactic for winning a scratch race (or an elimination race) for a stronger rider when racing against better sprinters, and it was perfectly executed.

        • Superpilot

          Totally right Boonen can’t blame anyone, he was penned in by good tactics from SVM and Stannard who, if they had the legs, could have rolled Boonen and Hayman. But they couldn’t, so Hayman stayed on front and Boonen stayed stuck behind. Hayman played it perfectly, you’re right about that. You’re right about him up the banking, this got him the momentum to overtake Boonen. He goes into the last turn in front and they are all at the same pace, not sprinting. Hayman is the first to stand and accelerate, halfway through that last corner, which I would call sprinting on tired legs. That’s why I stand by what I said, but yeah, I don’t know nothing.. Still great no matter how you see it :)

    • philipmcvey

      I agree with Michele – the other three getting back on surprised him. No doubt he had a clear vision of how to handle a two-up sprint, but then it suddenly became more complicated. He rode a fantastic race though, and more than that proved himself to be a great sportsman and professional afterwards. I don’t think many would begrudge him the record next year.

    • marcus_moore

      Think Matt used his track experience to win – drop from the top of the track onto Tom’s rear wheel & then around him in the back straight – Tom needed to bump Sep a little which wasn’t really possible given their fatigue levels – on an open road in a straight line Boonen would have won that sprint
      I really admire Boonen’s response to Hayman’s win

      • Dave

        Yeah, Boonen lost it 350m from the end when he neither took height or speed on the first turn. Track tactic lessons won’t ever come any more brutal than that.

        A strict track commissaire might have relegated Vanmarcke (Victoria Pendleton’s move on Anna Meares at London was not as bad as that) but I don’t think the boxing in would have made more than a little bit of difference to Boonen because Hayman’s gravity-aided acceleration made him sprint too early.

        EDIT: just realised a relegation to the back of the group wouldn’t have made a difference to Vanmarcke’s finishing position.

    • JBS

      I’d say getting boxed in by Vanmarcke and then Stannard cost Boonen the chance to contest the final sprint. I legitimately think Boonen had the legs to make it much closer than a bike length if he had a free run. But he wasn’t unlucky; he made a mistake that put him in a position to get boxed in. Hayman showed his track smarts and read the situation perfectly; led from the front and made the tired riders come past him if they could. History shows they couldn’t.

  • Discussion thread #8: Mat Hayman’s win: Orica-GreenEdge’s greatest victory? Best Australian cycling moment since Cadel’s Tour de France win?

    • Winky

      Of course.

      • Lach

        Without a doubt.

    • claude cat

      Gerrans’ Milano-Sanremo would be on par I think.
      Especially when that was for a brand new team, that needed big victory to set it on the world stage.

      • Winky

        MSR was important, but not as well-earned. Nowhere near as great in my book.

        • velocite

          I agree. Gerro stole that one. Of course he had to be strong and fast and smart to do it, and I’m a fan, but that win was not in the same league as Hayman’s, IMHO.

          • Dave

            The thing with Gerro’s MSR win was that there was nothing that looked ‘monumental’ about it, it looked little different from every other time he wins a sprint from a reduced peloton.

            I would rate his win at LBL better than MSR, but still well below this Roubaix and the team performances in the 2013 Tour and 2015 Giro.

            • velocite

              Yes, monumental, that’s the word for this win, isn’t it? This was serious, not mortal but sporting combat, a fair fight between well matched competitors, all at their limit. Felt like a privilege to watch it on the telly.

              • Dave

                Maybe also ‘monolithic’ if you see the trophy!

    • velocite

      Simply stupendous. That kind of conclusion to such a hard event is so moving, reminds me of Kieren Perkins’ win in Atlanta. But what seems quite extra-ordinary to me is how a bloke who’s been effectively a servant to others for so many years can come out and beat the stars. This was no opportunistic breakaway, he was just stronger, as well as confident and smart.

    • claude cat

      Ok, so how does this compare to Stuart O’Grady’s win at the same race? Yes not an OGE rider at the same time. But in regards to the question about “Australian cycling moment”.
      That seems so long ago now, but that was equally astonishing.

    • RWH

      This win has to be it, the pure astonishment on his face after the line combined with the individual that he is and what he has done for others over 17 years makes it a very special sporting result

    • Superpilot

      Matt wasn’t in any of the reckoning. You’d have to say it was the greatest win by an unheralded prospect. I have been a fan of his after watching details of what he did as road cap for Sky in the classics, so that is said with the utmost respect. He wasn’t in any top 10’s I’d seen. So to go in the break, make the 5 man selection (including getting back on a time or two), and outsprint them all, the distance between the original expectations and the end result must surely be the greatest result for the team. Chaves in Abu Dhabi is another example of possible but not exactly expected success for the team. MSR would have been more expected. Probably best mens pro road cycling moment since Cadel, but there have been plenty of world cup and Olympic medals since also, men and women.

    • philipmcvey

      Yep. Astounding and so well deserved. Seems like a genuinely nice guy who has given 100% for year after year and had what it took when he finally had his own chance. There was no element of luck; he had as much in the tank as the other four and he rode the last 5km smarter than the rest.

    • Dave

      All cycling or just road cycling?

      If the former, I’d say it’s slightly shaded by Anna Meares winning the sprint gold medal at the London Olympics.

      • Nathan

        Anna’s gold was great….but she was a champion before and after. That in itself is commendable, but Matty has been a domestique for so many years and when leading in some of the classics he was a rank outside chance at best. For me, that elevates this moment above Anna’s. And Cadel’s win was great and made every paper, but once again, he was a champion athlete who was always a contender (not to take away from that epic moment either). For me, Haymans win had all the drama of Cadels Tour win squashed into one day’s racing and from a guy who wasn’t even expected to be there.

  • Discussion thread #9: What else stood out to you from the 2016 Paris-Roubaix? What will you remember the race for?

    • Simon Wile

      The genuine shock on Mats face when he won and the humility and grace in victory he has shown. That final sprint, still gives me goosebumps on the replay.

      • Laurens

        Yeah, that face after the finish, waiting for someone to pinch him… but he actually did it!

    • Mike K

      I wonder what impact Hayman’s victory will have on Luke Durbridge? It was the best race I have seen him produce and maybe Hayman’s victory will give him the belief that he too can do it.

      • claude cat

        There were certainly signs that Durbo might actually turn into the classics rider we all thought he might be.
        Take away the bad luck of two punctures and a crash, and his result would have been even more impressive.

    • sket

      With four in the top 25, the Aussies had a good day out!

    • Aussie Bazza

      Absolutely fantastic result for Mat Hayman, so so good to watch. I love watching Back Stage Pass and this is the best one yet. For me, watching Tony Martin working for Boonen was hugely impressive.

    • Turbo

      Had Durbo not flatted and come off the back he would’ve likely been in, or close to, the front group too the way he was going. He’s going to take great confidence from that.

    • Michele

      For me, I thought Gianni Moscon was brilliant.

      Just 21. He looked so composed on the front for SKY. Looked like a seasoned veteran. I actually thought Robbie and Matthew K were calling it wrong, and it was in fact Viviani.

      Sure he crashed, but he still finished in the top 40 and crossed the line before Fabian.

      SKY’s cobbled classic squad for next year looks even stronger. Might be an issue though.

      • Great call. Exciting things to come from Moscon.

    • velocite

      The strength of the winner is emphasized by the good riders who couldn’t keep it up to the end, like Chavanel and Hausler. The first five had the goods. And the Orica backstage pass was memborable as well, great job.

    • C Grade Cyclist

      As a huge Haussler fan, was great to see the man from Inverell up at the pointy end of a race again. I hope he can have a couple of injury-free more seasons so we can see a few more flashes of his brilliance…

    • Michele

      The other thing that stood out to me, and not just in Paris-Roubaix, but also in RVV, is the amount of respect shown by the leading riders.

      At Ronde, Sep was all class not challenging Fabian for second place; allowing him to ride the final metres by himself.

      On Sunday, both Stannard and Boonen were respectful, gracious, and happy for Mat’s win. Mat’s presser, and the respect shown back to Boonen was also all class. He spoke with such humility. Even Sep seemed satisfied knowing he’d given his all and come up short in 4th place.

      I’ve always liked Tommeke [there’s not a cobbled classic rider I don’t really like]. But I reckon my estimation of him as a bike rider and person has only increased because of how he conducted himself after not winning.

      • Avuncular

        And those ears! The best in cycling by a mile. A class act is Boonen seemingly at peace with what matters most…family.

        But I note this too “There are many reasons why Hayman’s win should be remembered as one of the greatest moments in Australia’s cycling history, if not Australia’s sporting history.” Hell will freeze over before the masses look away from their ball sports in oz to such an achievement. I think it’s partly because no one knows what dedication and suffering is required in pro cycling. The drug scandals have possibly killed any attempt at understanding the sport too. Who cares anyway, I’ll treasure this win for a long time.

      • Dave

        The thing with all of those guys is that they’ve been around long enough to know that every domestique will have his day, and unfortunately for them it came up in a race they were targeting.

    • Cam

      It was a shame for Cancellara that he didn’t have a bit more luck in his final Paris-Roubaix, but that’s racing I guess.

      • Dave

        With crashing out of contention at Roubaix and coming so close at Flanders, I wonder if he might consider he has enough unfinished business to push his retirement back to do the 2017 spring classics?

    • marcus_moore

      I won’t necessarily remember the race for it – but Hausler had a brilliant race, is he a possibility for LBL or Amstel?????
      Turbo Durbo is a real chance in the next few years!!

      • Avuncular

        And let’s not forget another journeyman that did well…Zac Dempster.

        • Dave

          Five Aussies in the top 30 if you include Koen de Kort.

    • Dave

      What will Mat Hayman do next year? He’s been generally expected to be retiring at the end of this year, but the opportunity to race Paris-Roubaix with the number one on his back would have to be enticing.

      • Michele

        Do a Yaroslav and retire straight after next year’s P-R.
        It will probably be the only time he ever gets to wear the #1 dossard.

      • claude cat

        I thought he said he had a contract for next year?

    • Ross

      From a mechanical point of view it was interesting that an “ordinary” bike won and not a fancy dedicated cobble one like a Domane, Roubaix or Dogma K8.

      • Yeah, there’s a good line in the Backstage Pass video to that effect. I think it’s Luke Durbridge who says something along the lines of “imagine how easily you would have won if you’d been on the Addict!”

        • Dave

          First aero bike to win the race.

          The GCN race recap video pointed out this as well, that the only non-standard items were the 28mm tyres and a 44T inner ring.

    • Velloydy

      I will definitely remember the race for that fact that I had $3 on Hayman to win. At 401-1 odds! You little beauty Matty Hayman!

      • Michele

        Yesterday I was reading about Johan Vansumeren’s P-R win (in latest Rouleur). There are several parallels between his win and Mat’s. Amongst other things they’re both super domestiques, both had 2 x top-10 finishes prior, both made sure they were in the break before the forest, and both love the race.

        Johan was so confident he’d win, he told his dad the night before to lay a bet. Odds weren’t as good as yours, 167-1, but his dad put a lazy €1.000 down, or so he thought.

        So Johan wins, gets €30.000 for first place, and he and his dad are ecstatic. That is until they realise his dad’s bet was rejected because of incorrect Credit Card details ?

        • Velloydy

          I was pretty paranoid that I hadn’t placed the bet properly or something, so I definitely checked it after the race! Like Hayman himself I didn’t think it had really happened!

        • Dave

          Good thing he didn’t try that these days!

      • Dave

        You got stiffed. Some bookies had him at $800.

    • dbranson

      The call of the race by Matthew Keenan and Robbie McEwen. The best commentary in English was SBS. I will be watching their call on repeat for a long time. Chapeau Matt and Robbie.

  • Dom

    Sadly Hayman’s win has seemed to gather barely any coverage in the Australian mainstream media. I reckon he would’ve got more coverage if someone filmed him going through a red light as opposed to completing, arguably, Australia’s greatest sporting success in a number of years.

    • velocite

      It was on the ABC news last night. Albeit Ian Henderson pronounced ‘Roubaix’ as ‘Rowbay’.

      • Dave

        It was on the homepage of The Advertiser’s website with a large photo, placed well above the AFL which in turn comes above the rest of the sport section.

        I wonder if the media ignorance of cycling is only trumped by Dom’s ignorance of the media?

        • jules

          it was on The Age website, as a line item below “Muzz mulls move to the Panthers in 2019”

          • It was also on Channel Nine news and on SEN radio. I think the mainstream media coverage was actually pretty impressive this time!

        • Michele

          That’s thanks to Reece Homfray: the only News Ltd journo who is really into cycling. He’s a top bloke too, in comparison to Val, who I’ve had the “pleasure” of working alongside at the TdU.

          • Dave

            No matter how good the report is, it still needs the editor to choose put it up top with a large photo.

            When the cycling beat is quiet and Reece fills his time with doing AFL stories, he’s also the best AFL journo at the ‘Tiser.

      • Dom

        … at least he didn’t pronounce the ‘x’.

    • Michele

      Reece Homfray did a good write up on the AdelaideNow website – then again, he always does.

      I heard Monday’s midday news report on 5aa; its their most comprehensive bulletin. The lead story was cycling: an anti-cycling / pedestrians vs. cyclists story.

      Come the sport, there was AFL (understandable), the US Masters (understandable), the A-League (understandable), and then some random sports stories about some surfing heats, a female tennis final result involving Sloane Stephens and some other player (not Australian) and finally some other sport that I momentarily can’t recall. Not one sound bite devoted to P-R.

      • Dave

        So, business as usual at 5AA then.

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