BMC RoadMachine
  • MattHurst

    Great article, I will watch with interest.

  • Alex

    Can someone explain to me why BMC called in the RaceMachine? It sounds like this is an evolution of their GF series and essentially phases it out. I think this is confusing to both parties (those who want a pure race machine and those that want a more multi-use road bike) and will make consumers gloss over it when deciding upon a bike.

    • James Huang

      It’s not called the RaceMachine; it’s the RoadMachine. The name is meant to correspond to BMC’s aim that this is an all-purpose bike for all types of road riding, racing included.

      • Alex

        Little bit of a typo there, but my point is now there is name overlap between the RM designation for bikes that are somewhat on opposite ends of the spectrum when it comes to a road bike. The old one has calipers and race geometry, the new one has discs, slacker geometry, and wider tire clearance.

        • Daniel

          The old race machine is now the slr02, dont think they have called it a race machine since 2013.

    • Spider

      call it the ‘FunMachine’ or ‘AdventureMachine’. calling their time trial bike the TimeMachine was a stroke of genius though.

  • George Darroch

    That Focus looks like a mountainbike with that top tube! I’ll have to get used to it.

    Can’t wait to hear more about all of these bikes…

  • Wily_Quixote

    That’s as well written and informative as any article that I have read in the cycling print media.

    My opinion is that this current crop of bicycles doesn’t represent the ‘one bike to rule them all’, but rather a shift to versatility that will take some time to play out.

    I think those most ultra-serious racing types seeking the fastest bike for all applications will probably still get an aero bike that they will use with clip-ons for time trials.

    Until most amateur racers (or those that want to look like amateur racers) get their head around the fact that the bike is not what gives them gains in performance – it is training volume and intensity- I believe that bikes that imitate pro-bikes will still sell the most.

    i also don’t think that most cyclists really want to or can access vast miles of gravel roads to ride on either. But, all these caveats aside, this shift to performance, comfort and versatility in the same package is the best retro-innovation I have seen in my 25 years of cycling. These are probably the best road bikes for most people most of the time and its hard to see how anyone short of an a-grade racer would benefit from a specialised racing bicycle in 2016.

  • velocite

    Love the RoadMachine. Pity about the Di2 wiring though: that bike cries out for eTap.

    • Dave

      That would need to wait for the hydraulic brake version of eTap which is not yet ready for release.

      • velocite

        Yes, and in my case it would need to wait for the WiFli version: I need 34 x 32.

    • winkybiker

      Just needs the j-box hidden in the stem. It continues to baffle me why this isn’t becoming standard.

      • Dave

        The manufacturers won’t bother putting effort into bespoke solutions for the current version of Di2 so long as Shimano keep on insisting the next version really is coming soon.

        In any case, most Di2 faults I hear of involve the junction box so keeping it accessible is probably necessary while they work on improving or bypassing that weak point on the next version.

        • winkybiker

          I was thinking today, the SRAM are going to kill it with eTap unless Shimano quickly release a Di2 implementation that doesn’t look like a prototype.

          • Dave

            And that’s why Shimano keeps on telling us the next big version is coming very soon.

            They’ll need to hurry up and get it done soon. The only thing holding back a widespread shift to eTap is that the SRAM reliability stereotype has people too scared to be early adopters, but that will evaporate once eTap has been out long enough to prove itself.

            It’s not just SRAM they need to worry about, the next version of EPS could also get released before the next Di2.

          • Hamish Moffatt

            I was thinking maybe SRAM would get serious and drop the both-buttons-toggle-chainring nonsense…

  • Laurens

    “Retail price is US$11,000 / AU$TBD / €10,000”.
    Experience and the other amounts tell me that means AU$32.000

    • Andy B

      $13,999

      • Laurens

        Is that your guess or is it the real price? That’s not too bad then.
        And by the way, don’t mean to bash the bike, I like it and I like BMC. Just that green…

        • Andy B

          that’s the real price subject to final confirmation
          some other prices for you, these had been advised but may fluctuate slightly
          Road Machine 01 UDI2- $9,999
          Road Machine 01 Ultegra- $7,999
          Road Machine 02 UDI2- $6,999

          • Hamish Moffatt

            That’s quite a lot…..

            • Andy B

              Yep! Not cheap

          • Hamish Moffatt

            Top of the line Diverge in Australia is 6500. If only they sold it with UDI2 here…

    • some1s_lucky

      and then Giant brings out their version of an all road bike for 1/3rd of the rrp

      • James Huang

        Well, sort of. Maximum tire size on their new bike is 28mm. Nearly all of these bikes come with 28mm tires stock but all of them have room for more.

      • Andy B

        2/3 is more accurate

        • Wily_Quixote

          I have 28mm tyres on my 11 year old cannondale r1000…. they must have been thinking ahead

  • Larry @CycleItalia

    “Dismiss these new ‘all road’ bikes as yet another marketing scheme designed to part fools with their money if you must. But I’d argue that we’re entering a golden age for road bikes, and all indications point to many more of these to come.”
    OK, I’ll dismiss them as same s__t, different day. What was old is new. The steel bikes from the golden age of cycling pretty much did all this – but the industry told us we needed bikes with quicker handling, shorter wheelbase, expensive exotic materials, narrower tires, etc. while basically ending production of drop-bar bikes that could be ridden anywhere, Now that everyone has a road, aeroroad, endurance, fondo, gravel, chrono, ‘cross and gawd-knows-what-else road bike, it’s now been decided it’s time to sell us a “do everything” bike…as it’s the only one we don’t already have.

    • MadBlack

      Geez cheer up! Nobody is forcing you to buy a new bike. You’re more than welcome to ride your 30years old steel frame with frame shifters and toe straps.

      • Dave

        He’ll never be happy without something to complain about.

      • Larry @CycleItalia

        I will indeed drag my “30 years old steel frame with frame shifters and toe straps” out this Sunday, for this
        http://www.lamitica.it/home.php
        ….and be smiling alll the while :-)
        You don’t read all that much about these events on “enthusiast press” websites like these since they’re all about pulling that old bike out of the dusty attic and riding it again – something that doesn’t put a lot of loot into the bike industry accounts – since it’s not about the newest-latest, must-have, flavor-of-the-month the marketing-mavens have dreamed up. Might not be too long before there’s even an EROICA OZ since they already have them in Italy, UK, Japan, USA, Spain, etc.
        http://eroica.cc/

    • winkybiker

      This category of bikes is pretty close to one-bike-does-it-all. No-one’s forcing you to buy a new bike, but for many riders, one of these could replace at least 2 in their “stables”.

  • winkybiker

    Why no fender mounts on the BMC 01? Takes if off my list.

  • Masshoff

    Hi James. Could you elaborate as to why the Paralane would be the more “casual” of these 3 bikes? You mention this in regards to fit but looking at the stack and reach, they all seem similar, especially the Canyon and Focus – Canyon (size large) has 38.9/60.4 stack/reach and the Focus (size 56) has 38.5/59.2.

    • James Huang

      Sorry for the slow reply. Yep, the stack and reach between those two bikes are somewhat similar but the Canyon is still longer, the front end has a shorter trail (which means it will steer more nimbly at lower speeds), and the bottom bracket on the Focus is *very* low. It’s not quite as low as what Trek uses on the Domane but it’s still a pretty big departure from the other two.

  • Patch Hofweber

    “All three of these new bikes share a number of common features: […] hidden fender mounts”

    Hmm. Nobody else is reporting the Canyon or BMC as having fender mounts. Am I misreading this?

    • James Huang

      Sorry, Patch, that’s my mistake. The Canyon doesn’t have fender mounts but the BMC does, just not on the top-end 01 version.

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