Strava Marianne Vos Dani King Aviva Womens Tour
  • pedr09

    I really enjoy the stats, thanks for the very interesting article. I concur re the bike brand, I see an overwhelming percentage of women on Specialized and Trek. The research states that aesthetics are a big factor in buying decisions for women yet in my opinion, neither of those brands makes particularly attractive (or cheap for that matter) bikes.

    • Dave

      It’s true in Australia too, “pink it* and shrink it” works.

      Advertise your “women’s specific design” or “feminine colours” or even slap a different name on the down tube and many women will happily pay an insane amount of extra money for a road bike which is no different to the non-specific version. Even if it’s otherwise an ugly bike which is under-specified for the price point.

      * or pastel blue it.

  • Anon N + 1

    This survey is not well constructed to evaluate ” barriers to entry for more women taking up cycling.” The survey population is not a random sample of women or even of women in the UK. The population is ” over 5,000 active female cyclists in the UK. ” If there are barriers, these women have overcome them so of course the barriers are, for them, not that great. Perhaps one way to get an idea of what barriers there may be, Strava should ask each of the participants to recommend a friend or acquaintance who does not ride and ask these people about why they aren’t riding.

  • geoff.tewierik

    While I couldn’t see it clearly stated, were the survey participants Strava members, i.e. was the survey sample a selection of people made up predominantly of sports cyclists?

    If so how did the survey handle actual cyclists, i.e the ones that ride a cargo bike with the kids in it for school drop offs like @MamaMoose_Be

    • winkybiker

      I’d also like to know if the survey was of Strava members only.

    • Anne-Marije Rook

      Yes. Strava’s community.

      Anecdotal side note: Strava has changed to where I now see cargo moms use Strava to track their trips as much as competitive cyclists go after QOMs. Strava data is also being used by transportation departments to identify bike infrastructure needs.

  • winkybiker

    I can’t understand why the text says that 61% are inspired by pros, but the graph indicates that only 13% of survey respondents said so. Also, as said elsewhere, if this is a Strava-user survey, the results can hardly be extrapolated to the general population.

    It may be preferable to ask non-cyclists why they don’t cycle, than to ask cyclists to speculate about barriers to cycling.

    Is Dani King a statistician as well as being able to pedal fast?

    • Winter1

      I filled in the survey and there’s a difference between being asked if pros motivate you to cycle and another question which asked if you follow professional cycling and also if you are inspired by professional cycling. Of course, you can follow and be motivated by pro cycling without it being the main factor in you cycling yourself. I love watching pro races but it’s not what gets me on my bike most mornings, I do it for fitness and socialising.

      Also – you assume 5,000 women don’t have any experience in knowing about barriers to entry; it didn’t ask them about your own experience but whether you thought barreirs existed. Of course the respondents know people and friends who may or may not have experienced barriers.

      The problem I guess with asking non-cyclists why they don’t cycle is that it’s almost impossible to get a good enough sample size.

      • winkybiker

        Neither the 61% nor the 13% figures are mentioned in the context of whether they are “main” factors. They just contradict each other in the way they are referenced in the poorly-written article.

        I don’t assume anything regarding the experience of barriers that the 5000 women sport cyclists may have. I assume even less regarding their opinions about barriers to cycling. I’m sure they all have experienced barriers to cycling (and have evidentially overcome them) and I’m 100% sure they all have opinions. But isn’t the experience and opinion of people who haven’t/won’t take up cycling potentially even more relevant in terms of trying to understand what changes are required to get more of them to do so? (That the survey respondents “know” non-cyclists doesn’t mean that the non-cyclists’ experience and opinions are represented in the survey.)

        Why is it hard to get a good sample size of non-cyclists? They’re everywhere. Just ask them why they don’t ride bikes.

        As an aside….how were you selected for the survey? Did you, as a Strava user respond to an email request? A survey conducted on a self-selection from a specialist sub-set of the population is next to useless (and perhaps even dangerous) in informing any sort of policy decision.

        I stand by my position that it is unlikely that the presence of professional cycling does anything meaningful to encourage non-cycling people to take up cycling (men or women). Few of the non-cyclists I know could name a single team or a rider in the pro peloton.

      • Anon N + 1

        As I and others have stated, we have our doubts about the usefulness/validity of the survey with respect to learning why many women aren’t riding. Would you kindly explain how you were selected for the survey (without of course providing personally identifying details)? Are you a Strava user? Do you think the survey included any non-Strava users? Do you think it included Strava users who are not cyclists (e.g. runners)?

    • OhRoie

      Why do you assume being able to pedal fast precludes someone from being a statistician? Adam Hansen can pedal fast and he is an engineer, IT wizz and general entrepreneur.

      • winkybiker

        Why do you assume that I assume that? I was just asking the question…..

        • Dave

          I would suggest her being named in the press release, and the timing of said press release, is an attempt to piggyback on her having made news in the mainstream media during the last few days.

  • Chris OHearn

    This doesn’t tell us anything about women’s cycling, it tells us about the women who cycle and upload to Strava.

    I’ve seen a couple of reports but no link or search result to the survey or details of methodology which usually indicates either didn’t know what they were doing or they know it is flawed.

    Having said that, from what we’re given, if 40% of a group who we might reasonably assume are among the most committed female cyclists think there are barriers to cycling then you can bet that would be considerably higher among the non-Strava women’s cycling community and even higher among women as a whole.

    As for the professional cycling question, what really should have been asked (and perhaps it was but we aren’t being told) was whether women are interested in women’s professional cycling. Advertising and sponsorship is based on reaching target groups. If an advertiser can reach the same target groups through men’s cycling then they have no need to care about women’s cycling. The only way women’s professional cycling will attract decent sponsorship and advertising is if it can show it is reaching a different target group and therefore offering a unique opportunity to advertisers.

    I’m not a statistician but I work in quantitative research connected to media and advertising.

    • Dave

      > I’ve seen a couple of reports but no link or search result to the survey or details of methodology which usually indicates either didn’t know what they were doing or they know it is flawed.

      Or simply that it was a for-profit company doing the survey for themselves and issuing some of the results to generate good PR for themselves. The second part seems to have worked, CT-Ella swallowed it whole and were so excited about reporting on it that they forgot to include any journalism.

      > Having said that, from what we’re given, if 40% of a group who we might reasonably assume are among the most committed female cyclists think there are barriers to cycling then you can bet that would be considerably higher among the non-Strava women’s cycling community and even higher among women as a whole.

      Regardless of the rigour (or lack of) you can see a few broad brush strokes in there. Maybe it will prompt a bit of interest from a proper researcher somewhere?

      > As for the professional cycling question, what really should have been asked (and perhaps it was but we aren’t being told) was whether women are interested in women’s professional cycling. Advertising and sponsorship is based on reaching target groups.

      Keep in mind Strava were asking this for themselves and not on behalf of other companies potentially interested in sponsorship, so I expect they would have asked that even if they didn’t put the result in the press release. Strava does sponsor a few women’s races, so they have a vested interest in keeping it quiet if it might prompt other companies to get interested and push up the price of sponsoring women’s races.

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