Presentation Tour de France 2017
  • J Evans

    What seems to be lacking is a long mountain stage – one with many climbs, of 220km or over. The short stages are very much de rigeur, but variety is key. Also, a very long stage with many climbs might be Froome’s only potential weakness: he’s very good at one climb at the end of a stage, but how good is he over many climbs? Seems like the Tour have missed a trick here – it would be good to see such a test. And it’s much better if there aren’t long flat bits between the climbs that allow a rider’s team to pull him back into it.

    If the UCI was run with any competence, they would allow reduced team sizes.

    So, that won’t happen.

    • Superpilot

      On the contrary, having shorter stages may mean having lieutenants to burn will have less of an effect. Sky can go deeper with faster riders and a longer stage they will be able to protect their leader better than other teams. Shorter stages mean more riders would have more support left. Well, maybe…

      • Sean

        recently the short stages have been more exciting to watch.

        • Dave

          Thankfully, SBS produces a half-hour condensed version of the best bits of each Tour stage for the Victorian fans with their short attention spans.

          Even a long and hard queen stage would surely produce enough good material to fill half an hour.

          • Sean

            I couldn’t agree more Dave. Now what were we talking about?

        • J Evans

          We haven’t been given the option.
          Have both is all I’m saying.

      • Dave

        The shorter mountain stage in the Vuelta did play to the advantage of the teams that had stronger support riders, we saw Movistar and Tinkoff attack as teams while Sky’s B-team splintered.

      • J Evans

        A longer stage with many mountains and minimal flat bits in between could – if a GC contender attacks relatively early – leave the top riders without their teams for a long period of time. Can Froome cope with that? Let’s find out! A risky strategy, but Contador could well go fo it.
        A variety of stage lengths is better – I’m not against the shorter ones; I’m saying have both.

    • Dave

      The longer races/stages are the ones that produce the real champions.

      A grand tour should test the complete rider, and so there should be a minimum of one hard classics-length queen stage to crown a true champion.

  • Ride4fun

    Prudhomme says the course is supposed to reduce ‘catenaccio’ racing style. Don’t see that being the result of this course. It’ll once again be the TeamTimeTrial de France. Boring.
    Prudhomme calls for teams to drop from nine to eight riders in the 2017 race. Make it happen. How about down to 7 riders, then there will be no boring TTT de France, and add one or two more teams?

    • Shane Stokes

      Personally, I think seven is the way to go. And that will also enable ASO to invite more teams, thus reducing its demand to have just 17 WT teams. That should enable Dimension Data to stay where it is rather than be bumped down by this UCI/ASO agreement to only have 17…

      • SecretPro

        But the point is to reduce the number of riders overall, for safety and costs (makes a fairer playing field)

        • Dave

          No, the point with reducing the number of WT teams is actually to reduce the number of teams that the organisers are forced to accept, giving them more invitational slots so they can select the teams they want there.

          If the size of teams gets reduced, ASO will invite more teams to fill up the race to the UCI-mandated maximum of 200 riders. This is what they already do in some of their races like LBL where they have 25 teams of eight riders.

          • SecretPro

            Nope, that is not the agenda. Sorry to burst your bubble.

            • Dave

              You must be a Trump voter, right?

              Unlike most cycling events which do need to cut costs because they make a loss that must be underwritten by someone else (typically a state/province/canton government) or the organising company shut down, the Tour is profitable. They can afford to make changes which have a chance (but not a guarantee) of success.

              • SecretPro

                Trump proves that whilst you can be successful and a leader in your chosen field, it doesn’t guarantee that you won’t be a bafoon when discussing that you know not of.
                As you said, ASO have a cash cow, so why would they care about making teams smaller. Well smaller teams, will mean lost costs, accommodation etc, means more profit. See for ASO they have sold the rights, received the monies from all interested parties before the race starts! Less accidents, means less indirect costs.
                ASO needs a Frenchman to win, as that will increase exposure with resulting funds.
                Smaller teams mean lower costs for teams. Teams which make a loss all year long, and especially at the Tour. To have a more level playing field creates a more competitive field, where smaller teams can compete with Sky, BMC etc.
                It’s up to UCI to implement this and measures to reduce clashes with events, so that the future of cycling is healthy.

                • Shane Stokes

                  Given the amount of staff etc on teams, dropping one rider will have a negligible effect on costs. However what will be a factor is any financial arrangements wildcard teams may make with race organisers to get an invite to Grand Tours. Smaller teams means there is more room for invites to other squads.

                  • SecretPro

                    We’ll have to agree to disagree then. One rider less will have huge cost benefits, for a start one hotel room less per team, a sizeable drop in inventory, and I know you think you know how many staff are present, I can assure you that we’ll be able to drop staff members too. Wildcard invites will still happen, as they do now.
                    Perhaps in your perceived privileged position you’d like to get an invite to the Association meetings, where you might learn what teams/riders want.

      • Dave

        There’s the capacity there for ASO to propose a deal with the teams/riders representatives there, i.e. relinquish their demand for reducing the number of WT teams in return for the deletion of “subject to prior approval by the Professional Cycling Council” from the regulation regarding the organisers setting smaller team sizes for WorldTour races.

        Such a compromise would surely be readily agreed to by the six UCI representatives on the PCC (who would be keen to avoid ASO pulling the races which underwrite the credibility of the WT) which with the two event organisers’ representatives would mean the vote would get over the top of the rider and team representatives by a margin of 8-4.

        There’s even the possibility that the vote could get up 9-3, as one of the rider representatives is Bernie Eisel who stands to be downgraded to a Pro Continental team if there is no change and DDD miss the cut for next year.

        None of this will make any difference for DDD’s presence at the ASO races. If the present state of matters stays and nobody else withdraws from WorldTour candidacy* they will get all the invitational slots they want from ASO on the basis of being one of ASO’s favourite teams.

        * i.e. Bora-hansgrohe, who will now have the incumbent World Champion in 2017 rather than just a very high profile former World Champion.

  • Rosa Klebb

    Stage 16 is from Le Puy-en-Veley to Romans-sur-Isère, not Brioude

  • Superpilot

    Belgium, any cobbles? Being Liege I suspect just pinch climbs everywhere?

  • Dirk Demol

    You can tell who is French and who is not in the banner image; such superior styling.

  • SecretPro

    Hmmm, so this parcours suits a GC contender, who is good in the mountains, weak on the flats, and isn’t part of a strong team! Anyone else feel that ASO want a French winner this year…

    • Shane Stokes

      Course looks very suitable for Bardet, including the descents..

    • Sean

      2017 could be the year of Thomas Voeckler!

BACK TO TOP

Pin It on Pinterest

21 NEW ARTICLES
December 3, 2016
December 2, 2016
December 1, 2016
November 30, 2016