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December 15, 2017
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  • Roger That

    A thing of beauty. Love the understated look of it all.

  • Rex Lombardi

    Beautiful. The rear end looks a little tight though, is it a “pure racing bike”? Whats the max. tire width?

    • winkybiker

      Yes, in that one shot it looks really tight. Might just be the angle of the sun and the position of the shadow, though.

    • Ciaran Durney

      I can fit 35-36 tyres on

  • Luke Bartlett

    i should stay away from these features… beautiful

  • winkybiker

    Those brake hoods….the ugly….it burns….

    • MadBlack

      That is obviously your own personal POV and doesn’t take anything away from the sensibility of this build. By all accounts the brake hoods are extremely ergonomic during off road handling which is more of a factor in cyclo cross than on the road.

      • winkybiker

        Of course it’s my own POV. Who else’s would it be? They might be the best, most ergonomic brake hoods on the planet, but they’re never going anywhere near a bike of mine. Yes, I’m that shallow.

  • Daniel Zitter

    Flat mount w/ QR rear? Any rotor rub?

    • Ciaran Durney

      no, none so far

    • MadBlack

      Agree, the choice of a QR rear seems very odd considering all current mountain bike and even road bike trends. It also doesn’t make any sense because it’s a through axle out front. Any reasoning behind this choice?

    • Il_falcone

      It’s amazing how the marketing mechanisms of the bike industry still work after all those years telling BS to customers. Most people really believe that you would need a thru-axle even on a rigid frame when using a disc brake. When the reality is that it doesn’t make a difference with regards to brake rub, etc. Even some engineers working in the bike industry like Peter Denk say that, off the record evidently. As long as you use QRs that create some decent clamping force you won’t be able to notice a difference to a thru-axle set-up on a rigid rear end, period!

      • Maximus

        100% agree Il_falcone. From my experience, you don’t need thru-axles.

        • Wily_Quixote

          You don’t ‘need’ them but it’s easier and quicker to replace a wheel without getting brake rub, at least it is on my hardtail.

          Are there any disadvantages to having through axles?

          • Il_falcone

            It should definitely be the other way round. That changing the wheel with a QR is faster and the rotor should not rub no matter how often you take the wheel out and re-install it. And if the hub axle is straight and the end caps don’t wobble when turning the axle it works like that. Those prerequisites are not a given though with many hubs, with Shimano’s hubs being only the most prominent bad example. With those you have to install the axle always into the same rotational position where it was when you adjusted the brake caliper. It helps to mark the hub axle with a lacquer pen.

            Disadavantages? Other than the added weight and the increased amount of time a wheel change takes? No.

            • Wily_Quixote

              It’s slower for me to change a rear wheel with qr because it doesn’t sit as true, therefore it needs adjusting and retightening until it does sit true. Or I need to drop the chain to take tension off the axle. And then put the chain back on.I’m not making this up.

              It is possible that I am not doing it properly in which case a system that is foolproof is better than a system that allows someone with 20 years of bike fettling to get it wrong, despite the small weight penalty.

              • Il_falcone

                I certainly did not want to imply that you’re doing something wrong or were making something up. But when ever I noticed that a rear wheel needed “adjusting and retightening until it does sit true” I analyzed it and it was always the hub axle that caused the problem. With the DT Swiss hubs (240s and 350) I’m predominantly using on my own bikes and those that we have sold when QR drop outs on disc brake bikes were still common that problem simply does not exist. You should of course always make sure that the bike is weighted when you clamp down the QR so that the wheel axle is firmly pressed against the end of the drop out slots.

                • Wily_Quixote

                  Well that’s my point entirely. A through axle is foolproof – you don’t need to weight the rear wheel; which in my experience can still go awry. And if you have ever operated a can opener they are quick to use.

                  I don’t get the resistance to a solution that is quick and foolproof, at a slight weight penalty.

                  My hardtail has a QR rear end, I don’t think it’s a deal breaker but a through axle is a better solution, although as you say not strictly necessary.

            • Maximus

              And you can’t fit fork mount roof racks, unless you use an adaptor.

        • If you’re interested, we wrote an in-depth piece about through axles here: https://cyclingtips.com/2015/10/road-bikes-are-headed-towards-through-axels-but-why/

  • Andy Logan

    Another beautiful bike, love these custom Steel/Ti builds, makes me want to get something along these lines however I think her indoors will not be pleased!

  • JJ

    Cmon, treat yourself to a thomson seat collar

    • singlespeedscott

      No don’t. They are crack prone, pieces of expensive rubbish. I have broken 2 trying to get them to hold a seat post in place. A clamp should be forged not machined.

      • JJ

        fair enough, I have never had a problem. I have been using one for nearly 2.5 years without issue. What size where you using just out of interest?

  • Wily_Quixote

    If I was going to get a new bike this is what I’d get, except with a greater gear range and in colour.
    Beaut bike.

  • This is beautiful! May I ask why you went for very narrow 40cm bars on this one?

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December 15, 2017
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