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October 21, 2017
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  • Rowena

    I don’t care who I ride with, I certainly don’t care about what anyone rides, so if you’re ever in Perth, Western Australia and need a bike ride that is a real no-drop and can help you find other friendly bike rides then by all means let me know. Sure, I’m a Specialized Ambassador, but the last thing I’m worried about is your bike matching your kit or your kit matching your socks, or your shirt matching your knicks. We’re just here to ride our bikes, drink some coffee and maybe get to work on time. No pressure. We ride Monday’s 6am from Health Freak Cafe at Kings Park, we’re not fast, we’re inclusive and it’s Monday.

  • Rowena

    I don’t care who I ride with, I certainly don’t care about what anyone rides, so if you’re ever in Perth, Western Australia and need a bike ride that is a real no-drop and can help you find other friendly bike rides then by all means let me know. Sure, I’m a Specialized Ambassador, but the last thing I’m worried about is your bike matching your kit or your kit matching your socks, or your shirt matching your knicks. We’re just here to ride our bikes, drink some coffee and maybe get to work on time. No pressure. We ride Monday’s 6am from Health Freak Cafe at Kings Park, we’re not fast, we’re inclusive and it’s Monday.

  • Rowena

    I don’t care who I ride with, I certainly don’t care about what anyone rides, so if you’re ever in Perth, Western Australia and need a bike ride that is a real no-drop and can help you find other friendly bike rides then by all means let me know. Sure, I’m a Specialized Ambassador, but the last thing I’m worried about is your bike matching your kit or your kit matching your socks, or your shirt matching your knicks. We’re just here to ride our bikes, drink some coffee and maybe get to work on time. No pressure. We ride Monday’s 6am from Health Freak Cafe at Kings Park, we’re not fast, we’re inclusive and it’s Monday.

  • winkybiker

    Is there a chance that you’re projecting pre-conceived notions or expectations onto the behaviour you are identifying as “elitist”? But even if you’re not, there are lots and lots of people to ride with. Don’t ride with arseholes and your problem is solved. It really doesn’t need an article that may simply have the effect of reinforcing others’ prejudices on the same matter.

    • Rowena

      I wouldn’t think so, the behaviour the writer mentions is very much alive and well.

      • winkybiker

        But she doesn’t describe much in the way of behaviour, other than to say that the groups would want to ride faster than she did. Oh, and she criticized their bike handling abilities. So poor riders with nice bikes that ride faster than she wants to are “elitist”? Sounds more like a bad fit. She perhaps needs to ride with nicer people?

        • Simone Giuliani

          winkybiker I think you may be misreading the article a little. Monika didn’t say they wanted to ride faster than she did but that they would try and spit her out the back … knowing Monika “try” could be a pretty crucial word in that sentence – she’s not bad with a turn of speed! And she also explicitly said she didn’t have a problem with people having good kit and gear – “There is nothing wrong with owning the best equipment and riding in the most stylish cycling kit. But you shouldn’t have to buy your way into cycling group credibility and showing off fancy gear shouldn’t be the main reason to ride a bike.”

          • winkybiker

            How does she know they were trying to drop her, rather than just picking up the pace? My group sometimes rides faster than I’d like, but I don’t interpret it as them trying to spit me out the back. And what’s the evidence that one would need a nice bike and flashy kit to be accepted by that group? Did they criticize Monika’s bike? Did they say her kit was tatty? If people did this, then why would you want to ride with them? Just ride with nicer people. I just can’t agree that systematic elitism is ruining group rides. Not the ones I go on, anyway.

            • jules

              there is definitely a way of riding in a bunch that is unwelcoming. if there’s a gap and you take off putting down max. power, leaving others behind – that’s not good etiquette. sure, do that in a race – you’re trying to drop competitors. but in a bunch ride you look out for each other. I agree that in some cases people are hopelessly off the pace and no one is being deliberately nasty in dropping them, but in this case as an ex. world champion that doesn’t seem likely to be the case.

              the exception is hammer dropping smashfest bunch rides, where no quarter is given. but I doubt that’s what the author is referring to.

    • Wish I was on the bike…

      I find this an interesting and thought provoking article, and reckon there’s truth in what Monika and winkibiker say. Personally, I don’t have a problem with people having ‘closed’ groups if that’s what they want to do – I can imagine a formal networking group of accountants/lawyers/trades or what ever using their bike and coffee time for work networking. If that’s what they want to do – more power to them, but if I was a slower or less fashionably dressed person who otherwise qualified to be a member then I would hope the group would accept this diversity. A group may have a carefully planned training and development routine planned out and adding a rider to the leadout train may not be part of the plan.
      I think there’s room somewhere for Seinfeld’s notion of having enough friends and not having room for any more.
      Any of this exclusivity will come at a cost. The lawyer riding group may miss out on meeting the tradie rider who would do the best job of building their next extension. The tradie group could miss out on meeting the lawyer to represent them next time a principal contractor goes bust.
      My social and friendly group regularly sees a group (team) of riders who assiduously ignore every greeting or wave and have told my friends they are NOT welcome to sit on even for short descents. My friends have been shouted at to get off the wheel. This is pretty clear.
      There are so many dimensions to social behaviour and what enables people to ‘click’ at any given time that, I think forming binary views of exclusivity or elitism are too simplistic. Also, transferring the ‘physical freedom’ of cycling on our expectations of social interactions is imposing a bit too much on cycling. Some of us are gregarious, others not; on a given day a group or individual may be needing to get more of what holds a group together (leaning on friendships and trust) than what will expand a group (openness and gregariousness). On these occasions, social interactions with others may be less engaging than at other times.

      What is it in each of us that forms judgements about others as we compare ourselves to them, particularly when these judgements are negative about ourselves or others? What does it say about us – besides that we are human?

      I agree that cycling has an unfortunate reputation for elitism. I reckon it must come partly from the nature of the sport (often solitary, often, competitive.) It is unfortunate and probably worth a PhD some time (maybe when I retire). Or at least a more thorough exploration on the free-to-air pages of CyclingTips ;-)

      • Milessio

        It might be interesting to compare cycling’s attitudes to newcomers/outsiders with that of road running. For instance, parkrun’s weekly local 5km ‘races’ mixes elite runners with those who can only walk the distance, but elitism isn’t an issue, nor is expensive gear. Being weekly, it’s like a huge club run, where you cannot get dropped. Also, there’s no fake history/rules. (Cyclists in UK drank mugs of tea in cafes, not espressos, before cycling became the new golf).

      • winkybiker

        Part of my sensitivity is that for the most part, I’d likely fit the stereotype that Monika seems upset by. I have a nice, expensive bike, I wear either club kit, or Rapha/Assos. My stem is slammed, my guns shaved, tan-lines razor sharp. My bottles match. It’s important to me that I’m like this (I don’t know why) but I also don’t give a toss what others wear or what they ride. Seriously.

        I’m in shape. I don’t race but am always keen to make the best showing against others in our group rides (always no-drop, unless in specific circumstances, late in the ride, and then only with the express permission of the “dropees”). Certain hills and segments are ridden hard, and I’m part of that. We don’t do this to “spit people out the back”. I also have a competitive spirit in Fondos etc. but really just against my previous times. I don’t Strava but am cool with those who do. Even on club rides.

        Would Monika assume that I’m elitist? Based on her criteria, I’d think maybe yes. But she’d be wrong.

        Our club is non-discriminatory, but when prospective riders come for a test ride and their fitness/speed means that they won’t enjoy our rides, we suggest that they might enjoy another group more. This applies equally whether they are a faster or slower than our wide range of abilities. An aspiring Cat 1 won’t fit in, and neither will a very occasional rider, simply from a pacing perspective. The right level is “enthusiast” and weekend/aspiring racer. We have quite a few women in our club, and they’re treated the same as anyone else. Some are wicked fast, some less so, just like the guys. It’s all good. We don’t get bent out of shape by others joining in our bunch on the road, provided they’re safe enough and are prepared to chat.

        The reputation that cycling is becoming elitist is only perpetuated by articles like this. It achieves nothing. Assuming I am representative of all that Monika wants to see eliminated from the sport, I’ll be on my way. If I see you on the road, Monika, I’ll be sure to wave.

        • Superpilot

          I think you need to step back from the mic, you are friendly (presumably, quite often your posts are to the contrary). Sure you have the ‘look’, but Monika seems to be saying the look isn’t the problem, it’s the actual (not perceived) antisocial nature of some that she is highlighting. So relax, it’s others who look like you (and me) but don’t act like you (or me) that are at issue here. #sayhionyourride :)

          • winkybiker

            “It does not matter what your legs can do as long as your bike is reflecting its preciousness while waiting at the traffic lights.”

            There seems to be prejudice in this statement. My take is that Monika is reading too much into her experience. The vast majority of people I’ve ridden with couldn’t care less about the “preciousness” of other peoples’ bikes, regardless of how much we obsess over our own. Articles like this only serve to perpetuate the stereotype of “exclusivity” which (in my experience) is far from the norm.

          • Spider

            Monika, sorry that you have had negative experiences previously and I hope that you met a more positive cyclist that way you don’t stereotype us all.

            By the sounds of it there are at least 2 really nice, shaved legged, expensive-kit wearing, $10k-bike-riding guys out there (Winky & I) that could change your opinion!!!!

            See you on the ride and say hi at the lights!

        • I am very much with you on that. Great words.

        • NY’er

          Well said Winky. I think your description of yourself accurately describes many of the cyclists I know, including myself.

          I have a question for Monika: you’ve put forward an interesting point of view/set of experiences and it’s created a great little discussion. Won’t you join the discussion? I’d genuinely like to hear your response to many of the comments made here.

        • pedr09

          Your approach to your cycling is almost word for word how I’d describe mine, including the bunch you ride in, but reading this article, I didn’t get the sense Monika was talking about me. I know who she is talking about although for me, I find these people typically riding solo or in very small groups, not large groups.

          • winkybiker

            I might be too sensitive!

            • Thank you for taking the time to share your opinion and concerns about this article. To clarify, I have absolutely no problem with what a cyclist wears or what bike s/he rides – it is about the attitude that might develop from it. Cycling is one of the few sports and occasions, where people from all walks of life meet on two wheels – the 16 year old high school student, the 70 year old former Tour de France rider, the CEO, the tradesman and the mum with three kids. It does not matter where you come from, what your work is and how much money you have. Cycling is a sport that does not discriminate and that’s the beauty of it. Whether someone rides to race or just to get to the next café, it does not matter – at the end of the day, we still share the same enjoyment being on two wheels. Let’s cherish that! The choice of our bikes and gear should not affect our behaviour or attitude towards others.

              • winkybiker

                “The capitalism-induced search for a new status symbol has changed the reason why people ride bikes.” I simply don’t believe this to be true. People continue to ride bikes for a variety of reasons, but riding bikes as a “status symbol”? Nope. Not in any significant sense. Rare enough to simply ignore.

  • Rapha.

    • winkybiker

      Seriously?

        • Vincent Antony

          Rapha’s club is highly organised and has significant cost associated with running it (chapter coordinators and such). You also get free coffee, free express shipping, access to fleet bikes, a global community, friendships, group rides, free club hat, two magazines, access to exclusives, a members app… that’s why there’s a cost.

        • winkybiker

          So what? I’m not feeling excluded nor discriminated against by some people wanting to form a paid membership club. It makes zero difference to me. It’s not evidence of cycling becoming more exclusive in any general sense whatsoever.

        • That club was never launched. The actual one that was launched is way cheaper and does give you access to a number of things. It is also free to join for everyone, you dont need an invitation. Its a great way to connect with other club riders all over the world and much more. Vincent already mentioned many of its advantages.

          • zosim

            Actually it did launch in that form but year 2 was significantly modified. Year 3 looks to be changed again based on club forum comments.

        • zosim

          The rapha club has made it far easier for me to ride with people on business trips than any other time I’ve tried. I have standing invitations from half a dozen people to ride with them, local route knowledge. Prior to that I was stuck with posting on forums and hoping someone would reply but having a committed, engaged user base is better. Anyone can join providing you’re willing to pay the money; it’s not eliteist.

          • winkybiker

            That’s really cool. It’s great to ride with the locals when travelling. I don’t do nearly enough of it.

          • winkybiker

            That’s really cool. It’s great to ride with the locals when travelling. I don’t do nearly enough of it.

  • NY’er

    Hi Monika,
    I hear what you’re saying but unfortunately I think your expectations are too high. Of the 000’s of people you’ve met in your lifetime, how many would you consider close friends? For me, I can count my closest friends on two hands. The bottom line is that as humans, we just don’t get on with everyone.

    When my crew (small) ride, we’re super friendly to those that are friendly to us, but also get frustrated with others that ride up and don’t even say hello. Of the riders I know, if you ride up with a big smile and say hello, I reckon all of them will respond in a positive way. If they don’t, then they’re not worth knowing! Don’t let it get to you

  • Cal C

    My bike is old and heavy but I’m not a nice person…
    :-)

  • toffee

    Total hipocracy Ella,.

    • Simone Giuliani

      Toffee, that’s a comment that we knew we were likely to cop when we put out this article. We do sell high end kit but in my view there is a big difference between enjoying having nice stuff and thinking that having expensive stuff gives you an entitlement to behave like a git.

    • Remember that this is one person’s view and not stance that the world (or Ella, or CyclingTips) takes on cycling. We don’t bury other people’s views because they may not represent our own values, nor should we. Personally, I agree with Monika however.

  • Gabriel Vargas

    Brilliant. I know that it’s hard to most people to understand your point of view. Cycling is very traditional and full of an own ethos. We know that reification of cycling is what the bourgeoisie do to show how much they can spend, the much free-time they have and etc. This will kill cycling.

  • Dave

    Hopefully no actual golfers read this, as I’d prefer not to get a three pointed star imprinted on my butt next time I’m out riding.

  • Ajh

    Monika; it’s always been there. I remember going to club races in the 80’s and instead of being welcomed as a new member in what was then a very unpopular sport (in Australia) you were ignored and had to go through a bizarre rite of passage where they tried a number of dirty tricks to spit you out the back and hope you never came back. You either wanted to race and persevered until you got accepted or you said stuff it and went and did something else. My view on the issue that you have seen is that it is a symptom of countries where there has been recent rapid growth in cycling popularity; yes Im talking about the US, Australia, Uk and is not so common in countries with a rich cycling history. i much prefer to ride by myself these days than having to deal with people who believe they are more important than anyone else. For the record I do ride an expensive bike RRP $10k purchased second hand for a fraction of the price as the owner wanted the next best thing after 6 months riding. I do ride in $600 kit; but if you are happy with last seasons kit you can usually buy the kit new for under $200. Keep turning up to groups and eventually you will find the one that fits; for me I just prefer the solitude.

    • Damien Cook

      ‘Not common in countries with a rich cycling history” and you had Australia on the list! Not so at all. Bit of history might be the go for you. Cycling in Australia has a great past going back before the turn of the last century. Cycling was alive in the suburbs as a workingmans sport with heros as big as footballers. Just take Australia’s playground The Gold Coast. It was built on two wheels. Bruce Small made his fortune from Malvern Star and helped Oppy to his pre eminent place in world cycling. No history in cycling. Don’t think so.

      • winkybiker

        ‘straya perhaps has a long history in cycling. Rich? Not so much. And cyclists there are still despised by many motorists; more so than anywhere else I’ve ridden.

      • velocite

        I’m not informed well enough to generate a worthwhile view as to whether in Australia we have a rich cycling history, but I find it interesting to reflect on what was a big deal at the time I got my first full size bike – which happened to be a Malvern Star – purchased from Bruce Small’s shop in Elizabeth Street. Track was such a big deal, with the rivalry between Sid Patterson and the amazing Russell Mockridge getting front page treatment in the Melbourne Age. As I recollect, anyway. What happened? In any case, if we do have a rich cycling history I suspect there’s so little awareness of it it’s disappeared. Segue to something that may be related. There’s not doubt Italy has a rich cycling culture. Riding a bicycle in Italy is such a different experience to riding in Australia. The traffic is considerate, polite and respectful, in my experience – and that’s in serious contrast to what it’s like in Australia. The improvement is so slow.

        No idea whether there’s any connection between those matters and shitty behaviour in cycling groups!

  • Hank Moravec

    Not quite sure I get this one. Didn’t Monica in one day to Alpe D’Huez along with 108 miles and 15,000+ feet of climbing in one day? Who exactly is running rides where a cyclist of her level gets dropped? As a new devotee, I can certainly relate to the issue where certain groups feel like they are not really welcoming to newcomers, but I don’t get the feeling its down to equipment, I get the feeling its down to strength and speed. I live in Southern California, and have not yet come across a ride where the ability to spend $ trumped actual ability. I have taken part in many drop rides, and if anything, the true drop rides are very polite. You can hang for awhile, then away they go, and that’s that.

  • Reese Masita

    **Standing ovation** This is my favorite paragraph: “The capitalism-induced search for a new status symbol has changed the reason why people ride bikes. Cycling has become pretty, elitist, materialistic with a seemingly insurmountable wall to be climbed to be accepted into a group. Until then, you will be shamelessly ignored as a hubbard or fred.”. Closely followed by: “Let’s make cycling what it should be – a sport you do for pure enjoyment as you revel in the wind in your face, the endorphin kick from going fast, the new friendships, the rewarding coffee afterwards and the accomplishment of success.”

    Could not have said it better! Great article Monika…. Can we all please take the ego out of cycling.

    If you need some help identifying elitist, materialistic, capitalistic induced behavior this should help:
    1. You ridicule others and put them down.
    2. You won’t let people join your group or training rides.
    3. Your behavior is not inclusive (boys club/girls clique).
    4. You think you are better than others.
    5. Your team is less about helping other cyclists and more about elevating your own selves.

    • winkybiker

      I won’t ride with people exhibiting this behaviour. Simple. But maybe that makes ME elitist.

      • Reese Masita

        Or it makes you a compassionate rider that does not tolerate sophisticated forms of social bullying in cycling. I don’t think we need to avoid them, we simply don’t need to revere or support them. Echoes from Ghandi “you must be the change you wish to see in the world”. If we simply choose to be kind, inclusive and compassionate riders, it also means being compassionate towards the elitist douche-tards of cycling who have as much to learn about the spirit of inclusivity as others stand to benefit from receiving it. The spirit of the same benevolence applies to all.

  • allthegearandnoidea

    Maybe Monika has encountered a few of the snobbier ‘dudes’ in some places where she’s ridden, but generally I’d say cyclists are a pretty friendly and welcoming bunch (pun intended).

    But surely this is CyclingTips being ironic, right? Y’know CyclingTips, with its reviews of the most bespoke and expensive bikes, it’s exclusive range of premium kit and wanky accessories, its no-expense-spared ‘roadtrips’ (“Hey – lets send 3 hipster dudes to Bali and film the trip !! Their tatts will totally astound the locals….”)…its ‘VeloClub’ ….

    I’ve been a cyclist AND a golfer for 50+ years – what’s left after you strip out the ‘flash Harrys’, the gear snobs, the stereotypes and the clubhouse/coffeeshop braggers is what’s fun and valuable about both activities.

    Keep looking for that Monika, and you’ll always find new friends to play with.

  • allthegearandnoidea

    Maybe Monika has encountered a few of the snobbier ‘dudes’ in some places where she’s ridden, but generally I’d say cyclists are a pretty friendly and welcoming bunch (pun intended).

    But surely this is CyclingTips being ironic, right? Y’know CyclingTips, with its reviews of the most bespoke and expensive bikes, it’s exclusive range of premium kit and wanky accessories, its no-expense-spared ‘roadtrips’ (“Hey – lets send 3 hipster dudes to Bali and film the trip !! Their tatts will totally astound the locals….”)…its ‘VeloClub’ ….

    I’ve been a cyclist AND a golfer for 50+ years – what’s left after you strip out the ‘flash Harrys’, the gear snobs, the stereotypes and the clubhouse/coffeeshop braggers is what’s fun and valuable about both activities.

    Keep looking for that Monika, and you’ll always find new friends to play with.

  • allthegearandnoidea

    Maybe Monika has encountered a few of the snobbier ‘dudes’ in some places where she’s ridden, but generally I’d say cyclists are a pretty friendly and welcoming bunch (pun intended).

    But surely this is CyclingTips being ironic, right? Y’know CyclingTips, with its reviews of the most bespoke and expensive bikes, it’s exclusive range of premium kit and wanky accessories, its no-expense-spared ‘roadtrips’ (“Hey – lets send 3 hipster dudes to Bali and film the trip !! Their tatts will totally astound the locals….”)…its ‘VeloClub’ ….

    I’ve been a cyclist AND a golfer for 50+ years – what’s left after you strip out the ‘flash Harrys’, the gear snobs, the stereotypes and the clubhouse/coffeeshop braggers is what’s fun and valuable about both activities.

    Keep looking for that Monika, and you’ll always find new friends to play with.

  • allthegearandnoidea

    Maybe Monika has encountered a few of the snobbier ‘dudes’ in some places where she’s ridden, but generally I’d say cyclists are a pretty friendly and welcoming bunch (pun intended).

    But surely this is CyclingTips being ironic, right? Y’know CyclingTips, with its reviews of the most bespoke and expensive bikes, it’s exclusive range of premium kit and wanky accessories, its no-expense-spared ‘roadtrips’ (“Hey – lets send 3 hipster dudes to Bali and film the trip !! Their tatts will totally astound the locals….”)…its ‘VeloClub’ ….

    I’ve been a cyclist AND a golfer for 50+ years – what’s left after you strip out the ‘flash Harrys’, the gear snobs, the stereotypes and the clubhouse/coffeeshop braggers is what’s fun and valuable about both activities.

    Keep looking for that Monika, and you’ll always find new friends to play with.

  • Wily_Quixote

    I don’t even try and bother waving at other roadies any more. It seems futile.
    I am not sure when cycling became an elitist cult with bizarre homoerotic rituals but I suspect that it was somewhere around 1996 when I read in bicycling Australia magazine about Tony Rominger’s ‘perfect almond shaped calves’.
    When I was a kid cycling was a curious, hardass, working class sport where membership came with keeping up with the bunch. Membership for young male and female riders seemed to be a basic steel bike and probably one pair of knicks and a jersey, official gear cost a fortune back then.
    Not exactly sure when you needed Rapha socks and the right ‘luft’ but I blame the internet, parlee riding lawyers and riders mistaking narcissism for class.
    Sites like CT perpetuate the gratification of the consumerist and superficial with celebration of uber boutique bicycles and products like the aforementioned cycling caps.
    FFS ride your bike and leave the preening in the mirror and the celebration of ‘kit’ over civility to the golfers – if that’s indeed how they behave.

  • zosim

    I used to ride MTB in the UK with a group that was welcoming to anyone who wanted to come along. 90% of the time we had a no-drop rule which meant we regrouped regularly, waiting for the slowest members and the other 10% was usually because there was a small group of riders going along who were time limited and you’d accept that either you’d be dropped if you wanted to ride slowly (or session a section) or drop people if you wanted to maintain your schedule. We rarely invited strangers to the latter as it isn’t fair to drop people in areas they may not know and we’d gathered up riders several times from a local shop ride who’d been dropped and didn’t want to be the arseholes who did that to people we extended an invite to. I only remember one occasion out of over 50 rides where we escorted someone back to the start and that was when it was clear their technical ability was going to cause them problems as the ride progressed. This was done after one trip where I had to drive someone’s car 200km as they landed in hospital after riding something way beyond their ability.

    In my experience, cyclists are usually friendly but there are people I know here who ride who absolutely do NOT want to ride with larger groups and therefore don’t invite people they’d happily have a meal with to their group rides. Nothing to do with kit or skills, just they don’t want the stress that comes with large groups. If it’s purely on kit then it’s their loss, they’re probably not the people you want to ride with anyway.

    • velocite

      Sounds like you were a very good Samaritan with that car return, kudos.

  • nycebo

    What Monika writes takes place in every sport. As already written on this thread, there are introverts and elitists everywhere. For my part in NYC, I’ve seen quite a few rude riders (mostly to other pedestrians actually) but I’ve seen MORE cool, nice, friendly dudes just out there to ride. If you can keep up (or down), they are fine with it…and most won’t even ask you to pull. I think it’s all in the attitude. Anyway, sorry to hear that you’re not feeling the love. For a change of pace, stop by Strictly’s in Fort Lee for an espresso. You can ride with me and my buds up 9W anytime you want.

    • Does this attitude exist in mountain biking? Possibly at the elite end of a racing field (or perhaps a perception), but to me you could not find a more welcoming or encouraging sport.

      • zosim

        It does and doesn’t. The same sort of people who act like arses towards some roadies also do the same for MTB rides; latest bikes, kit etc are to be loved, old stuff not at all. I’ve never experienced the snobbery on the road though.

      • Spider

        Agree. Great sport, great people…but I don’t think it’s possible to compare the 2…mountain biking is kind of like a Individual Time Trial, getting dropped or dropping is mandatory…and waiting is mandatory in my experience (for group rides).

        I love seeing fast guys on the trail…you get a ‘hello mate’ and then they are GONE!!!! leaving you thinking ‘Jebus, how does he do that?’ and not….he’s not very cool for not riding/talking with me.

  • JBKayak

    Riveting, I can see why veloclub charges a fee. Give me a break! Bad business model cycling tips. What makes this article more valuable, more exclusive, than an article written last week and published on your free website

  • Andy B

    Ive been riding for a while.. its always felt this way in some way or another for me
    It was just a matter of finding the right group which took time
    But hey finding the right group for golf is much the same.. as are all aspects of life
    Im not really sure its about judging equipment either, some people are just ass holes

    I would say 90%+ of people I see out riding aren’t outwardly friendly.. a smile wouldn’t go astray

  • Andy B

    Ive been riding for a while.. its always felt this way in some way or another for me
    It was just a matter of finding the right group which took time
    But hey finding the right group for golf is much the same.. as are all aspects of life
    Im not really sure its about judging equipment either, some people are just ass holes

    I would say 90%+ of people I see out riding aren’t outwardly friendly.. a smile wouldn’t go astray

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