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June 27, 2017
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  • johnny knows

    What’s the purpose of adding bar tape to the pedals of Tony Martin’s bike?

    • Probably because the middle part of Shimano pedals can get slippery when wet and even pros dont get it right 100% all the time. Better safe then sorry.

      • David Everett

        @johnny_knows:disqus Slipping and a really solid feel, making sure theres zero float are the two main reasons. You usually see this done at the Classics, I do know that Adam Hanssen seems to do it to all his pedals all year.

      • MMaster

        He’s using Look pedals, the tape is to eliminate any lateral rocking & (annoying) creaking from the cleat/pedal interface

    • Sean

      Obviously for comfort.

  • I love the look of that Cervelo. These lines, classic and modern at the same time.

  • Joshua Sek

    That Giant stem is actually just an older SLR stem, found on models up until 2014.
    The only thing I notice that is different is it appears to be -17 degrees, whilst the production versions at that time were only -10.

    • macandbumble

      Doesn’t that then make it a new version?

      • Joshua Sek

        I would think it is probably a one off for the pros, why would Giant recycle an older design stem just to change the angle?

        • macandbumble

          Only reason I can think of is that people demanded it? #slamthatstem

          • Joshua Sek

            Yeah I agree, but I would expect them to offer the newer (current) version in the -17
            I would love to see a -17 released!

            • Richard Lamb

              I wonder what is the percentage of non-pro using -17.. I understand it is rare and not many stems come in this angle but is there a real market demand for it? A few years ago I was all in for #slamthatstem and bought myself a -17 Thomson stem, the bike looks slammed and ‘pro’. I am glad it is my second bike now as long ride on it is always a struggle. Maybe I am just old.

              • Andrew O’Neill

                For punters (like me), it can come down to finding the right fit, while having flexibility with your set up.

                For me, I’m in between sizes. I could squeeze onto the smaller frame with a 130+ stem at -6 with 20mm of spacers, or I could size up with a with a 120mm stem at -17 with no spacers. Either option would’ve been fine, but I want to keep the frame for a while and when I stop racing, I might feel more comfortable in a slightly higher position.

                Plus (and perhaps the main reason) a low -17 stem looks badass compared to a -6 with 20+mm of spacers!

              • David Everett

                I’d be surprised if there’s a real demand for it, especially if a good LBS has helped with position. I’ve spoke with one major bike manufacturers team liaison officer in the past about slammed stems, they said at times no matter how much time they spend on bike position, some riders will disregard the results and slam the stem no matter what. Even the pros want that ‘pro’ look.

              • Andrew O’Neill

                For punters (like me), it can come down to finding the right fit, while having flexibility with your set up.

                For me, I’m in between sizes. I could squeeze onto the smaller frame with a 130+ stem at -6 with 20mm of spacers, or I could size up with a with a 120mm stem at -17 with no spacers. Either option would’ve been fine, but I want to keep the frame for a while and when I stop racing, I might feel more comfortable in a slightly higher position.

                Plus (and perhaps the main reason) a low -17 stem looks badass compared to a -6 with 20+mm of spacers! Image attached… https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/ae3c575cf982f2a0906ea0c339b880c260a6a2674be86521143ee3a0080c65b5.jpg

                • Richard Lamb

                  That was my exact approach! I ended up with a 56 frame instead of 54 and chose 2.5mm spacer and -17 instead of 15mm spacer with -6! Sizing down is the more ‘pro’ approach though.. a bit of a catch22.

                • Daniel

                  Im the same and also on a BMC. I never took much notice of head tube length on geo charts until I owned this bike, and it will now be the first thing i look at on all future bikes.

    • David Everett

      Thanks for point this out. Keeping track of old equipment isn’t an easy job. The pro’s do love a negative stem, that’s why so many ot for the pro issue FSA pro only 140mm -17 stems that you see on the FDJ bike.

      • While the 140 mm length stem tells us the t-shirt sized bikes don’t fit very well. Top tube lengths for the pros wouldn’t sell well to the punters who seem to want everything exactly like their heroes EXCEPT the riding position. I’ve lost count of the $10K+ “pro” bikes I’ve seen with riders on ’em who look like they could be riding beach cruisers!

  • Sunny Ape

    Looks like even the pros get FSA stems with chrome plated bolts that rust too.

    • David Everett

      @sunnyape:disqus The weather on the first two stages would have rusted carbon!!! ;)

  • George Darroch

    The Factor Slick looks very much like a Trek Speed-Concept.

    Which isn’t to denigrate it. The Speed Concept is a very good bicycle.

  • Nitro

    Haimar Zubeldia – fascinating use of electrical tape.

    Why not either (a) Customise a screen on your PC8 so that HR isn’t shown or (b) If the team doesn’t need to analyse your HR data after the stage, just ditch the HR Monitor…

    Or am I missing something ?

    • David Everett

      You know these pro’s, all the gear and no idea.

    • 900Aero

      HZ must prefer to not know his heart rate just like he must prefer that no-one notices how many stage race top ten finishes he’s managed or how he got there without a single podium…..he’s a mysterious cat.

    • campirecord

      Become a team mechanic and you will see. For example, a rider who comes to the van 3 minutes pre start and asks if someone can re-program his screen… yeah right… Bar tape. All these head units go straight to the bus for download and yes, HR reading will be part of the analysis. Imagine all the non stop transfer and 18 hour days… bar tape.

  • Jimbo Solvang

    The paint on that Lapierre is striking. I like the combination of chrome blue and the rest being regular. All chrome schemes seem a bit ridiculous. Trying to make a carbon frame look like alloy.

  • badhombrebigdo

    That Cervélo is siiiiiick.

  • Robert Merkel

    So are tubs still universal in the pro peloton?

    I know they’re nice to ride on and a tad lighter, but sheesh, that’s a lot of extra expense and hassle for a bike that’s no faster than one on high quality clinchers.

    • Wondering the same all the time. Maybe thats the only thing weekend warriors cant copy that easily and thats why they all keep doing it. Its pro. Must be a pain for the mechanics.

      • There was nobody happier than the team mechanics back when Michelin was paying big bucks to get teams on their clinchers. Riders like Fignon turned out to be pretty happy too if you believe what he wrote in “We were young and carefree”.

    • Tricky Dicky

      I think it is more to do with the way you can continue to ride on a tubular wheel after a puncture (for a while anyway) before you need to get a spare. It’s relatively safe. Clinchers, on the other hand, roll off the rim when they go flat catastrophically – not good when flying along in a large peloton.

      • Exactly. If I was the team boss and didn’t have to glue anything myself, I’d want my expensive riders to be on something that wouldn’t likely come off in the event of a flat. Interestingly enough, tire sponsor Wolber (owned by Michelin, whose rep shared this story) would quietly put BigMig on Wolber-branded clinchers for the big mountain stages. The reason? They were more concerned with melting glue and the lumpy ride if/when a tubular shifts on the rim under heavy braking than what might happen due to a flat. Go figure.

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June 27, 2017
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