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  • mrp33p3rs

    o no…the levers are ugly. curious what frame is used for the sky blue colored bikes

    • James Huang

      All of the frames were made for Campagnolo by Sarto.

    • ebbe

      Looks like a Sarto Asola. That’s the “go to” demo bike for Campagnolo. With a special disc-specific fork in this case.

    • jon

      the levers aren’t as bad as Shimano 105 hydraulic levers.

      • Sunny Ape

        I’ve got a bike with 105 hydraulic levers. Yeah, I didn’t like the bulbous look that much at first, but they’ve grown on me since. They actually feel really good in the hand and are dead easy to adjust and service. The ‘big knob’ shape really doesn’t bother me at all anymore.

        • James Huang

          Agreed. I have these on a Specialized Roubaix I’m currently wrapping up for review, and while I don’t care for them visually, they’re nicely shaped.

  • jh

    I think it looks awesome. I’m looking forward to it and hope we see some of the brands include full campy road bikes in their range.
    Not sure about the extra width of cranks, rotor specific calipers, and rim width. Seems a bit complicated.
    Ive always love Eurus and shamal 2 way fits and think they will be perfect for disc builds. In order to alleviate concern, I hope they start to supply extra spokes with wheels so people don’t freak about “proprietary” components.
    Excellent review

    • James Huang

      The cranks have a modified chainline but the Q-factor is unchanged at 145.5mm.

      • nPGQSizfg3

        Would this affect have an effect on chainstay lengths? Can we have a short chainstay?

  • ebbe

    Finally! Been waiting on this for two years. Anybody want to buy a set of used mechanical Ergopower shifters with HY/RD disc brake calipers? ;-)

    Good write up James, and with lots of pictures

    • James Huang

      Ha! That was my personal setup for quite some time.

      • ebbe

        Nice! Works quite well, doesn’t it? I did drill tiny holes in the caliper levers to route the cable on the other side of the cable clamp, to account for the shorter Campagnolo cable pull. I just told myself to trust myself because I’m an engineer ????

        Having said that, I fully expect a full hydraulic system to be even better.

        • James Huang

          Funny, I did the exact same thing. Great minds…

    • Morten Reippuert Knudsen

      I’d proberbly pick up a Chorus DB brakes/levers too. Reused my 07 Chorus 10 speed levers with HY/RD’s when i build up a gravel bike last spring (have Chorus 15 on the road bike).

  • jon

    I know I have said this before else where on this site, but fork tire-clearance is determining factor on whether a disc-brake road bike looks “racy’ or not. In the case of Campagnolo Sarto demo bikes, the overall package looks fantastic.

    • James Huang

      They rode pretty nicely, too :)

      • jon

        BTW, are the rotors compatible with Shimano’s spline design? or is this a Campy specific spline?

        Oh my, this puts Shimano’s 105 hydraulic system to absolute shame; talking about ugly levers.

        • James Huang

          Yes, it’s the same spline pattern. Campagnolo would have been quite foolish to do anything otherwise.

  • ND

    Shame the boras aren’t tubeless, none of the other manufacturers have trouble with carbon tubeless. I’ve been waiting a while for this, looks like there’s a new groupset in my future :D

    • James Huang

      Agreed, and a bit surprising given that Campagnolo has already demonstrated support for tubeless elsewhere. That said, I’m personally more interested in the new Shamals, as the non-disc version are some of the nicest pre-builts I’ve ridden.

      • ND

        Meh, they’ll be along in one or two years, and yes the Shamals are a tidy set of wheels. Can’t wait!! Great write-up, thanks James.

  • Rusty Gramm

    can you use the Potenza disc levers with the new Centaur 11 group for a “budget” Campy disc build? been talking myself into Campy for a while, this might just send me over the edge

    • James Huang

      I’ll see about asking Campagnolo about this. Centaur is specifically designed to work with wider-range cassettes, so the internal shifter geometry *might* be different.

      • Rusty Gramm

        Thanks! I love learning about groupset interchangeability. SRAM and Shimano is pretty straight forward, but Campy sometimes remains a mystery

    • CL

      maybe pairing a Centaur groupset with TRP Spyre road mechanical calipers? Although I’ve read good things about those calipers, not sure how much worse they are compared to hydraulics. It wouldn’t look that bad either.

      • James Huang

        Campagnolo levers don’t pair very well with TRP Spyre calipers. Ergopower levers pull a little less cable than the Shimano or SRAM ones those calipers were optimized for, so you unfortunately end up with less pad clearance and a mushier feel than you’d really want. The Hy/Rd is a better match if adjusted properly, as are the Yokozuna Motoko/Juin Tech R1 if you aren’t as concerned about heat capacity.

        • CL

          Thanks for the info. I did know about leverage difference between drivetrain brands, however not about the poor pairing with the TRPs. Guess I’ll research a bit on those caliper/brake models because otherwise it would be full Potenza Hydraulic

    • ebbe

      There’s a pretty good change that Potenza shifters and Centaur derailers would pair up just fine. I’ve read (but of course not confirmed myself, so I can’t guarantee anything) that the shifting internals of Potenza shifters are exactly the same as the Centaur shifters. That would of course mean their indexing is exactly the same as well. Both groups also take the same cassettes (officially up to a 32 cog) as far as I know. Sounds like a good idea. You will likely miss out on the “Disc Brake specific chain line” though, so maybe a Centaur chainset would not be the best choice… If you believe those 2,5mm make a real difference.

  • StevieTopSiders

    General question about tubulars: what determines how wide of a tubular tire you can put on a tubular rim? The external width of these Campy wheels is 24mm, so is that the max? How is actual tubular width determined between the nominal tire width and rim width?

    I’m curious because there aren’t many tubular disc wheelsets meant for road. The only ones that come to mind are Roval CLX 32 Tub and this new Campy one. The other tubular disc wheels seem aimed at the CX market and are all fairly beefy and well above 1500g. I want to build up a disc road bike soon, and I want a pair of training tubeless clinchers but then an ultra-light set of race disc tubulars, and I honestly can’t find too many of those.

    Regarding the Campy, I’m a big fan of the native 160mm up front. I want to get a bike with 160mm discs (I’m ~80kg and there are quite a few hills in Seattle). Most forks and flat mounts are native 140mm and can get to 160mm with adapter, which is fine, but no adapters is better imho

    • James Huang

      That’s a good question, and one we should perhaps examine in greater detail. I’m not aware of any hard-and-fast rule, and given that many cyclocross tubulars are simply glued to road-specific rims, I’m not sure there is one (although ‘cross-specific wheels with larger-diameter tire gluing beds and wider rims generally offer a more reliable bond surface). Unless a company specifies otherwise, even disc-compatible tubulars that are aimed at cyclocross racers often just use a standard road rim (Enve’s CX being one notable example, but there are definitely others).

    • Superpilot

      Until the pros are all riding disc tubs I’d say you’ll be looking for a minority specialist wheelset. Maybe just custom build?

      The wheelsets will be heavier (so 1500g plus) owing to the disc specific hub and the disc and disc hardware, through axles if any etc etc.

      Also they need to carry more spokes (apparently) than rim brake wheels as you are torquing the wheel from the inside across the diameter to the road surface, rather than torquing at the rim itself and the spokes just having to hold their shape. So they will be heavier by necessity also. That is perhaps why they all seem aimed at CX (higher weight and spoke count) when actually, that is what is required by the physics of it all, apparently. I think the wheel companies are very tentative to drop spoke counts on disc rims for liability purposes.

      • StevieTopSiders

        Yeah, the three I’ve found that I would consider light-er are:

        Bora DB – 1215g – 24.1mm width – $1965
        Roval CLX 32 – 1230g – 27.1mm width – $2400 (says they can be used for cross, but seem more road oriented at 21/24 lacing)
        Zipp 303 FC Tub Disc – 1400g – 28.5mm width – $2400 (these seem a little more cross-oriented with 24/24 lacing)

        • Velt

          Off the top of my head Reynolds does some tubular disc brake wheels

          • ebbe

            Yep

        • JK

          AX Lightness do some very nice disc tubulars.

          The Zipp ‘disc’ wheels are a joke, it’s just the same rim with a finish over the brake track.

    • winkybiker

      No-one needs 160mm on the rear. The split 160 front/140 rear is perfect for everyone.

      • StevieTopSiders

        Thank you, component company representative. Glad to hear you’ve changed your tune from recommending 160mm for road and 140mm for CX.

        • Winky

          When did I recommend that? I’m not saying I didn’t, but I rarely comment on CX stuff. My memory might be going! There’s nothing wrong with 160mm on the rear, it’s just that you don’t need it. (rear heat loads are only about 30% of front loads, and about 1% when you’re REALLY braking hard on dry roads). 140mm on the front may have unfortunate limitations, however.

  • Dane Morrison

    James – do you have a pic of Post Mount Caliper? Are they really making it?

    • James Huang

      Sorry, I may have made an incorrect assumption there. Campagnolo’s test prototypes were obviously post mount (which also suggests there is already tooling in place), but the complete pricing sheet I have doesn’t list them. I’ve edited the article until I can get final clarification from Campagnolo. My apologies for the confusion (and for any false hope, if it ends up the post mount option truly doesn’t exist).

    • Sunny Ape

      They probably did post mount during development, but dropped it since the industry has moved to flat mount now. Odd that Campy have chosen a ‘half-n-half’ with calipers with fixed bolt spacing.

      • winkybiker

        Not odd. It’s elegant and it’s great. Using adaptors as standard (Shimano and SRAM) is just clumsy.

        • Sunny Ape

          Changing from 160 to 140mm rotors for flat mount calipers is a simple exercise of unbolting, rotating the caliper on the adaptor and re-bolting. There is no way to achieve the same with the Campags; one size at the front, like it or not. Two sizes at the rear, but you have to replace the entire caliper to change.
          Not so sure that’s my idea of elegant or great.

          • winkybiker

            I understand that. But with Campag, you don’t ride around with an adapter for the rest of the time. You just have the simplest possible set-up. That’s my idea of elegant. See elsewhere on this thread for where I opine that there is no need to swap, nor choose alternate sizes. Why would you want 140mm on the front, or want 160mm on the rear?

            • Sunny Ape

              Why? Because you can. Choice is better than no choice.
              Anyhow, let’s agree to disagree.

  • Andy B

    Wow that’s an impressive price

  • velocite

    Matt Wikstrom gave a thumbs down to the Canyon Ultimate CF SLX Disc a few weeks ago because it was 1 kg heavier – including a mere 70g contributed by the frameset. Now James tells us that the Record disc groupset adds only 78g over the rim brake version. Not the same ballpark. What’s going on?

    • Canyon’s Ultimate Disc bike was sporting a first-generation Ultegra Di2 road disc group set and high-profile carbon/alloy wheels. As James points out above, the next generation of road disc group sets are paying a lot more attention to weight to minimise any penalty. Same applies to the wheels, where Campagnolo is challenging conservative thinking on spoke count and lacing patterns with their latest road disc wheelsets to minimise weight gains. All told, things are looking up for road disc bikes. I’m really keen to hear if Campag’s disc brakes develop any squeal/screech with long term use.

  • Winky

    I love that they have chosen to not use mounting adapters.

    • James Huang

      It’s a slick setup that makes you wonder why it isn’t the norm elsewhere. Granted, the size-specific calipers make things more complicated (and eliminate the potential for changing rotor sizes later), but from a purely functional standpoint, it makes a lot of sense.

      • Winky

        Yeah, but why would you want to change rotor sizes? 160mm up front and 140mm in the back and you’re done. Lamenting the ability to change them would be a bit like being frustrated that your race bike won’t take 26″ MTB wheels.

        • James Huang

          The inability to change later would really only be an issue from a resale standpoint, but it’s something to possibly consider nonetheless. Lighter riders (or ones living in less mountainous areas) might also prefer to run a 140mm front rotor, and with this setup, that’s not possible.

          Otherwise, the complication aspect applies more to the OEM or bike shop side of things, not so much for end consumers.

          • winkybiker

            Choosing the smaller front rotor might not seem such a good idea when that trip to the Pyrenees is considered, though.

            Given that road bikes can have so much more intense braking duties that other types of bicycles, saving a few grams on the front rotor seems foolish.

    • DaveRides

      Wow, they are actually direct mounted.

      Contrast that to Shimano, who are adding extra links and adapters into every new product and then calling them Direct Mount.

  • Smw

    shut up and take my money !!!! LUV !!!!

  • Winky

    The front G3 lacing looks the perfect arrangement for discs. Double non-radial spokes provide extra strength for the shallow-dish brake side. Logical engineering. Just wonderful. The rear G3 has always been a good setup (Shamals and Eurus are among my favorite factory-built wheels). Switching the double spoke side to the left would have made no sense as the double spoking is designed to compensate for the dishing and resultant shallow spoke angles and to therefore equalize spoke tension left-to-right. Rear braking forces are low and a second-order driver, as you say.

  • Charlie

    Thanks for this comprehensive first impression. They look great. As a Campy-phile I think that people like be might have held out on anything disc brake related until now. So hopefully they haven’t completely missed out on the market. In terms of sales, it will remain to be seen whether this is a venture wasted!

  • Winky

    I like the engineering of Campag’s leverage adjustment. I never considered the ability to simply adjust free-play (as SRAM and Shimano do) to be important at all. I actually want as little free play as is possible (why would anyone want MORE freeplay), consistent with adequate pad clearance. With the Campag system, I can actually adjust lever feel (and lever-throw/braking force relationship) between short-firm and longer-softer.

    I’ll acknowledge that I seem to be a fan-boy, but I’m finding a LOT to like about Campag’s engineering here.

  • Giuseppe Magnetico

    I lost a bet… The collaboration was down to Magura and Formula. Early on when the teaser photos first appeared a couple years ago I was 99% sure that this would be an all Italian collaboration with Formula..Nonetheless, this 30 year Campy user will be camping out at my shop the night before like we used to for Iron Maiden tickets.

  • Bärlach

    So I suppose that from next year we will see disc brake pro peloton.

  • nPGQSizfg3

    If we use these H0/H11 cranks, I take it we don’t need longer chainstays (min 415mm as recommended by other groups). Is that correct?

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