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  • edelman

    No worse for you than EPO or HGH!

  • Stewie Griffin

    Smoking marijuana doesn’t have a single benefit in competition, it shouldn’t be banned. I used to smoke a lot, and I occasionally still do off season. There is no performance benefit to it what so ever on the contrary, it’s harmfull to performance. But recreational, relaxing, pain relieving benefits.. Shouldn’t be on the ban list imho. It’s a better drug than zoloft, percocet, xanax, valium, diazepam, stilnoct, & whatever the pro’s are taking over the counter.

    • plain__bagel

      You should get a vaporizer ;)

      • Stewie Griffin

        I have been checking into that, however, still remains for out of competition use only, since it’s traceable for 100 days..

    • Carlos Flanders

      fwiw, There’s quite a lot of published research to show that long term cannabis use has a small increase in lung capacity

  • Benjamin Arians

    I would speculate that Floyd’s hip necrosis was at least partly due to repeated Triamcinalone/Kenalog injections in the hip.

    • Wily_Quixote

      Wouldn’t it be the other way around? Kenalog is an intrarticular injection for joint inflammation and pain.

      • Benjamin Arians

        See below for a fuller explanation.

        • Wily_Quixote

          I still do not agree.

          1. has Landis admitted to corticosteroid use? he used to anabolic steroids (not corticosteroids), HgH and EPO – why would he use corticosteroids when their ergogenic effect is unclear?

          2. Avascular necrosis of the hip is a bone regeneration problem from a vascular cause. Corticosteroid use is a theoretical cause of avascular necrosis, no causation has been demonstrated. An equally plausible cause is emboli from EPO use. A high haematocrit is a knoen risk factor for the development of emboli, emboli in the fermoral head vasculature is a known cause of FAN.

          3. there is no evidence that injections in the gluteal muscles cause increased serum levels of corticosteroid in the femoro-acetabular joint. in fact, it is not even feasible. When injected, the drug will be absorbed by the lymphatic or venous system, in either case the drug will pass through the venous circulation first before passing through the heart, artery, microcirculation and finally tothe femoral head. The drug will be in a stable serum concentration by then. Any direct absoroption to the femoral head directly via the injection depot is implausible.

          4. The putative cause of the FAN in Landis was a femoral neck fracture sustained in 2002. The FAN is probably related to the trauma of this fracture and not any PEDs.

    • He broke his hip in a crash. Are you saying Kenalog weakened the bone and caused it to fail in the crash, or are you saying that the poor healing and necrosis that followed was due to an attempt to use Kenalog therapeutically to reduce inflammation post crash?

      • Benjamin Arians

        It is a fact that repeated injections of corticosteroids can cause degeneration of joints near the injection site. A common injection site for triamcinalone/Kenalog is the hip/glute. No good orthopedic surgeon would recommend cortisone injections to reduce inflammation of a joint damaged in a crash, as the long term effects are joint degeneration. If he used Kenalog as a performance enhancer, it very well could have weakened his hip joint, causing it to be more susceptible to crash damage. Also, who can take for granted it was actually damaged in a crash? Just speculation, but this is the guy who wrote a book about how he didn’t dope, then later admitted he did, and is having to pay people back who donated to his Free Floyd Fund (or whatever it waa called).

        • Wily_Quixote

          there is no evidence that injections in the gluteal muscles cause increased serum levels of corticosteroid in the femoro-acetabular joint. in fact, it is not even feasible. When injected, the drug will be absorbed by the lymphatic or venous system, in either case the drug will pass through the venous circulation first before passing through the heart, artery, microcirculation and finally tothe femoral head. The drug will be in a stable serum concentration by then. Any direct absoroption to the femoral head directly via the injection depot is implausible.

          For a fuller explanation, see above.

          “No good orthopedic surgeon would recommend cortisone injections to reduce inflammation of a joint damaged in a crash, as the long term effects are joint degeneration”

          No, but good orthopaedic surgeons use Kenalog for osteoarthritis – which is the main indication of the drug.

          • Benjamin Arians

            Kenalog is used in osteoarthritis patients as a short-term treatment to alleviate acute symptoms and severe pain, not as long term treatment. Recent studies have shown that there is reason to believe “that intra-articular corticosteroids have a “profound, yet differential” dose-dependent impact on mesenchymal stem cells, also suggesting a “potentiation” of joint disease.” That was from a Mayo clinic study. So, your statement that the absorption into the femoral head being implausible isn’t backed up by current studies.
            http://www.rheumatologynetwork.com/aaos-2015/steroid-injections-may-hasten-hip-joint-degeneration

            • Wily_Quixote

              The reference you cite is about intra-articular injections (in the joint) but your hypothesis is that gluteal (in the muscle) injections cause increased femoral absorption.

              The two things are completely different. Given that the mechanism is very implausible, do you have any evidence that gluteal injections of triamcinolone cause increased absorption of drug in the femoro-acetabular joint? If not I am calling BS on this hypothesis.

              • Benjamin Arians

                Call what you want. Have a happy Thanksgiving, I’ve wasted enough time thinking about Floyd Landis today.

  • Puncheur

    “I started to feel happy”…no shit! On a serious note, I’m more concerned about the frequency at which I smell pot smoke from cars that pass me on the road. Around London, it’s now very common, not cool.

    • andyoldlabour

      Same down here in Kent. It stinks and the users wander around in the mornings making the town centre look like a scene from Sean of the Dead.

  • Robert Merkel

    Interesting story.

    For what it’s worth, taking CBD off the banned list sounds like a reasonable step.

    As far as cannabis or some other THC-containing product, you wouldn’t want athletes using it in competition any more than you’d want a alcohol-affected (or opoid-affected) rider in competition. Competitive cycling is dangerous enough, thanks! But if a rider wants to smoke a joint outside of competition, I can’t see why it’s a matter for the antidoping authorities.

    • MadBlack

      Totally agree! To me the most shocking fact from the article: alcohol is off the list!!! Seriously?! I mean, yes, of course it doesn’t enhance performance but would anybody want to race with alcohol affected riders? Same goes for tramadol and THC. C’mon WADA get your act together!

      • DaveRides

        The interesting thing is that alcohol is currently banned (in competition only) in four sports, to which the UCI could have added cycling to the list ages ago if they chose to do so.

        Those four sports are aerobatics, motorsport, powerboat racing and (I can’t help sniggering at this one) archery.

        It is being taken out of the list because waiting for a sample to come back from the lab a few weeks later is missing the point. Alcohol is better addressed by event officials using a breathalyser kit, not going through the anti-doping regime. All sports have the power to do this unilaterally, if cycling does not have a random testing regime for riders, convoy drivers and (after the 2017 TdF fiasco) commissaires then that is totally a UCI problem.

        Tramadol is different, because it is an indirect performance enhancer. Perhaps the UCI should sponsor the necessary studies to get the process of inclusion moving along?

    • jules

      I think it gets tricky as to whether detected traces of THC were active or residual in someone’s system. I believe canniboids or whatever are the detectable trace substance hang around for a while. It also varies by test type, with I believe urine samples more sensitive.

      I think WADA just says “banned: THC” or similar

      • Stewie Griffin

        Detectable for 100 days in your blood, it’s shorter in urine samples

  • Vivre

    Actually hilarious how the cry goes up for legitimization and acceptance of a feminizing drug (THC) that has proven deleterious health effects while a masculinizing naturally occurring substance (Testosterone) that is proven medically beneficial is banned, despite both substances enhancing performance. This milieu defines perfectly what is politically approved in US culture: smoke your weed and remain docile. Do not assert yourself, especially don’t question the political power structure.

  • andyoldlabour

    Over here in the UK, weed isn’t really legal. I say “isn’t really”, because it is rife around some of our local towns, and the users are off their heads on it. They cannot function properly, they are very often aggressive, they commit crimes to fund their addiction, and they cost the state too much money to sort them out.

    • Is this a joke, or some attempt at trolling? Your local towns may have aggressive people, committing crimes to fund an addiction, but that addiction isn’t to cannabis.

  • Wily_Quixote

    There was a report in Britain’s New Scientist magazine last week that stated that the FDA in the US had warned a number of companies to desist from making incorrect health claims in regard to medicinal cannibis.
    The same report stated that a number of products for sale in the US had variable levels of the active ingredient,cannabidiol, some with none present whatsoever.
    Cannabidiol has proven to be efficacious in treating pain and epilepsy but, at the moment, the market in the US appears to be poorly regulated.
    Cannabidiol should be treated like any other drug and there is no reason that I can discern for it to be on the banned list.

  • Adam Schwarcz

    Grown Rogue is *NOT* the first cannabis sponsored cycling team. BPG/MontanoVelo was, they were written up about it in VeloNews way back in 2007. http://www.ncnca.org/ncncaforum/bpg-montano-velo-team-2008

  • Chris

    “It’s important for athletes to step up and say. ‘I use marijuana and here’s how it helps me’.”

    Yeah, I’m sure they’ll do that. I can’t think of any negative consequences of declaring you use a drug.

  • Joelbass79

    Shouldn’t use THC containing strains during a race, obviously. Having someone high as a kite in the peloton is obviously pretty dangerous… but outside of that? Who cares?! Let the countries/states decide if riders can do bong rips on their couch between training sessions. This whole “spirit of the sport” crap is a bunch of nonsense.

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