Time Cyclo gravel pedal: Road performance meets mountain function

by Dave Rome


Time’s new Cyclo pedals seek to combine the wide and stable platform of a road pedal with the mud clearance and easy walking of a mountain bike system. Designed with gravel and touring riders in mind, the French company’s latest pedal system looks to have the potential to be the best gravel-style pedal yet.

The Cyclo features a single-sided clamping mechanism, built around what we believe to be a similar cleat to Time’s pre-existing ATAC mountain bike system. Likely a brass cleat, this will offer the industry-standard two-bolt mounting pattern and provide a claimed 5° of angular float. The self-cleaning mechanism provides spring tension adjustment (model dependant) and also boasts Time’s patented Iclic design. This feature keeps the pedal in a pre-opened position awaiting the cleat’s entry – a first for a mountain bike-style system.

Aesthetically these look much like a road pedal with a slim frontal profile that tapers deeper once past the axle. There’s an angular profile that should allow for generous ground clearance when pedalling through corners — certainly better than a double-sided mountain bike pedal. However, that elongated body isn’t just for style and should provide a solid platform to assist with power transfer and foot stability – the latter being something a stiff-soled shoe alone can’t achieve.

These are pretty exciting, at least on paper, but there are a few questions to be answered. Namely, we’re interested to see whether the front stabilizer bar, which extends well beyond the clip mechanism, works with a wide variety of common SPD-style shoes (which commonly have varying tread designs). Assuming the pedals are free from compatibility issues, and the sealed bearings stand up to abuse, these could be a wise alternative to Shimano’s somewhat lacklustre ES600 pedals. We’ve requested a pair for review to find out.

Time will offer the Cyclo in three versions — the 10, 6 and 2 — priced at US$130, US$110 and US$75 respectively (other currencies TBC). The Cyclo 10 and 6 both feature the same lightened steel axle, adjustable spring tension, and metal pedal body protector at the cleat contact point. Claimed to weigh 256g for the pair, the Cyclo 10 receives a carbon composite body, while the Cyclo 6 weighs 2g more with a glass-filled composite body. The entry-level Cyclo 2 (290g) features a solid steel axle and loses the metal wear plate and adjustable spring tension. The Time Cyclo range will be available from late November.

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