3T’s 60th anniversary Dreambox bike comes with its own motorized garage

Why settle for just a special-edition bike when you can have a dedicated 200 kg standalone storage case for it, too?

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3T is celebrating its 60th year in business, and like any self-respecting bike brand with that kind of history behind it, the company has released a limited-edition model. In 3T’s case, it’s a special version of its Exploro RaceMax aero gravel bike, though the party includes far more than just a bike. 

There’s a garage, too. Really. Well, sort of.

In addition to hitting the six-decade milestone, 3T recently brought frame production in-house to Presezzo, Italy, switching from Asian manufacturing with a lot of manual labor to a more automated setup involved filament winding and post-layup resin injection (a topic we’ll discuss in greater depth in an upcoming Nerd Alert podcast episode with company owner Gerard Vroomen). Painting is done in-house, too. 

It was a big deal for 3T to bring frame production back “home” so to speak, and that Italian sourcing is a big part of this 60th-anniversary bike. It starts with the company’s flagship Exploro RaceMax Italia, which — of course — is then built with Campagnolo’s Ekar 1×13 mechanical groupset. 3T augments the package with its own made-in-Italy Torno carbon fiber 1x crankset, Discus 45/32 ultra-wide carbon rims, forged aluminum stem, and carbon fiber bar. Carbon-Ti then supplies the hubs, thru-axles, steel-and-carbon fiber disc rotors, and aluminum water bottle cage bolts. The 700×35 mm Pirelli Cinturato Gravel M tires get special badging on the sidewalls, Elite supplies a set of Leggero Carbon cages, and the whole lot is capped with a custom painted and 3D-printed Fizik Antares Versus Evo 00 saddle

At least in pictures, it’s a beautiful bike to behold with its iridescent and elegantly minimal blue paint job. 

I personally don’t find the Exploro RaceMax frameset to be the prettiest shape in and of itself, but in this treatment, it looks decidedly elegant.

To go along with the bike, 3T has partnered with a number of other Italian brands to make sure you’re properly outfitted for the ride. There’s special-edition riding kit from Castelli, a Kask Protone aero helmet, sunglasses from Koo, Fizik Terra X4 gravel shoes, Elite Fly bottles to put in those ultralight cages, and even a Campagnolo Big Corkscrew so you can recover with a suitably aerated glass of wine. 

But wait, there’s more! 

Surely you can’t be expected to just store that bike next to the other lesser steeds in your garage, and that limited-edition clothing definitely can’t co-mingle with anything else in your closet. To rectify all of that, 3T is supplying a custom-built “garage” that opens with a touch of a button on the wireless remote control and has dedicated spots for all of that fancy gear. Lest you think it’s just a dark cave inside, the whole thing is outfitted with interior LED lighting. From the outside, the giant gold-accented black box is sort of like the bike industry version of the monolith from Arthur C. Clarke’s Space Odyssey (which, interestingly enough, was set twenty years ago).

The flared down tube is intended to divert air around water bottles for less aerodynamic drag.

Seems a bit over the top, no? Even 3T admits that it’s “rather insane”, but I’d imagine that only made the company want to do it even more — and I’d be lying if I said this exercise in gross excess doesn’t bring a grin to my face.

Needless to say, the entire “Dreambox” anniversary package is extravagantly priced at a truly jaw-dropping €19,610. American buyers get to join in the party if they’ve got US$19,610 to spare — plus US$750 for trans-Atlantic shipping. Maybe you just want the garage “for your other 3T bikes”? Well hey, that’ll only cost you €4,900 plus shipping. 

3T is limiting Dreambox production to — of course — 60 pieces. And while this whole thing probably seems completely bonkers to everyday folks like you and me, my guess is that 3T will sell every last one of them. 

More information can be found at www.3t.bike

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