How to watch the 2022 Tour de France, wherever you are in the world

How to watch the Tour in various territories around the world.

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If you aren’t lucky enough to soon be like one of the fortunate people in the above image watching Tour de France at the roadside this July, then sitting in front of the television will have to do.

It’s a summer (sorry Aus) tradition. Lazily sitting in your living room at the weekends watching the kilometres tick by, while in the office during the week (at least in the pre-Covid days) becoming highly skilled at switching tabs away from your chosen streaming site back to your work whenever your boss walks by.

With the Tour de France beginning in Copenhagen on Friday, July 1 and finishing in Paris on Sunday, July 24, here’s how to watch the three weeks of racing wherever you are in the world.

How to watch the Tour de France in…

USA

First off, the NBCSN cable channel is no more and the NBC Sports Gold Cycling Pass has been discontinued. Instead, NBC has rolled its cycling coverage into the Peacock streaming service. The good news is it only costs $4.99 month-to-month, meaning you can cancel it as soon as Tadej Pogačar crosses the finish line in Paris to claim his third yellow jersey in a row at a canter. Hurrah! Alternatively, FloBikes will also be broadcasting the Tour on their platform at a cost of $12.50 a month.

Live-streaming services aside, the race will still be broadcast on the NBC-owned CNBC and USA television channels.

Australia

Cycling fans down under will be able to watch live coverage on SBS, with replays of each day’s stage also available on SBS On Demand every day. Their full TV schedule for each stage can be found on their website. Just make sure you don’t wake the baby at 3 am when Ben O’Connor wins the Alpe d’Huez stage and storms into the yellow jersey.

UK

UK viewers can watch Messrs Imlach, Boulting et al. on ITV4, with their daily highlights show also airing every evening. GCN/Eurosport will also have their coverage featuring Bradley Wiggins chasing the peloton on a motorbike, while Welsh viewers will be able to watch the race on S4C.

Viewing on ITV, both on your physical television and via the magic-ness of online streaming, is free, as long as you can remember your ITV Hub password. Meanwhile, GCN+ costs £6.99 a month or £39.99 when you pay annually, with no ad breaks, while the same coverage will be broadcast on Eurosport’s freeview television channel.

Bahamas

Not sure what the situation is to be perfectly honest, but if you find yourself in the Bahamas then you don’t really have anything to complain about.

Canada

The aforementioned FloBikes will broadcast the 2022 Tour de France in Canada, eh. Come on Woodsy!

New Zealand

Sky Sport will likely be showing the Tour de France in New Zealand. The cable service costs NZ$26 per month and an extra NZ$32 per month on top for the Sky Sport package that you’ll need to watch the Tour. Worth it just to see Shane Archbold’s mullet though am I right?

Other territories

GCN+ will only be showing the Tour de France in Europe and Asia-Pacific, excluding Australia, New Zealand, China and Japan. Here is a rundown of where you can find Tour de France coverage in other territories.

  • Belgium (Walloon) – RTBF (digital)
  • Belgium (Flemish) – VRT één
  • China – Zhibo tv
  • Colombia – CaracoITV
  • Czech Republic – Čzeská Televize
  • Denmark – TV2 Sport
  • France – Francetvsport
  • Germany – ARD
  • Ireland – TG4
  • Italy – RAI Sport
  • Japan – J Sports
  • Luxembourg – RTL
  • Middle East & North Africa – BeIN Sports
  • Netherlands – NOS
  • Norway – TV2 Sport/TV2 Sumo
  • Portugal – RTP2
  • South America – ESPN
  • Slovakia – RTVS
  • Spain – Teledeporte (or digital)
  • Sub-Saharan Africa – Supersport
  • Switzerland – SRG-SSR

Some of these broadcasters have exclusive rights, while others are sharing broadcast rights with Eurosport/GCN+. Be sure to check out the website of the broadcaster appropriate to your region for more information and broadcast times.

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