Daily News Digest

by Mark Zalewski

July 8, 2016

In today’s CT Daily News Digest: Twenty-nine at the line! Cavendish surpasses Hinault, slots into second in all-time Tour stage wins; Giro Rosa Round-up: Stevens wins atop Madonna della Guardia, Guarnier is back in pink; Sterbini soloes to Austria stage victory; Von Hoff sprints to stage win in Sibiu Cycling Tour; Tour leader Van Avermaet on taking yellow: ‘I think it’s once in a lifetime for me’; Holm: ‘If Dan Martin doesn’t finish top ten I’ll cut off his ears’; How Greg Henderson went beyond the call of duty to make Tour de France team; Rights groups urge sponsors not to back Bahrain WorldTour team; Report: Contador to Trek-Segafredo in 2017; 19-year-old suspended for EPO use; British Cycling and Cycling UK call for more land access for bikes; Cyclocosm’s How the Week Was Won: 2016 Tour de France, Stages 1-5; Mara Abbott on the Giro Rosa; Tour de France, stage 5 on-board highlights; Tour de France rider quiz: Who’s the grumpiest rider?; Life on the Tour: CyclingTips 2016 Tour de France Vlog, part 1; Alaphilippe pulls one of the oldest tricks in the book

19-year-old suspended for EPO use

by CyclingTips

A 19-year-old British cyclist is suspended from competition after admitting to using banned blood booster EPO. Gabriel Evans was handed a three-and-a-half year ban by UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) for the violation. A father of a teammate saw a vial of EPO in Evans’s possession during a training camp in France, and notified UKAD.

Since he was 18 at the time and a junior, UKAD reduced his ban by six months.

“Here is a young man at the start of his sporting career whose decision to intentionally cheat has significantly impacted that career before it has really begun,” said UKAD’s chief executive Nicole Sapstead.

“Evans clearly acted intentionally when he decided to purchase and use EPO. However, doping is not a straightforward decision and every person’s motivations are different. Some do it for money, some do it to win. Some do it because they are curious and have seen others doing it.

“It is therefore absolutely correct that every case is treated individually, and in this case that the sanction was reduced by six months to reflect that, as a young man of 18 at the time he committed the violations, Evans’ decision-making skills were impacted by his relative immaturity.”

Click through to read more at Cycling Weekly.

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