Aerobie AeroPress Coffee Maker

December 17, 2016

Coffee and cycling, cycling and coffee. It’s a beautiful, long-standing pairing and the coffee culture among cyclists seems bigger than ever before.  But cycling also tends to take you to new, and often remote, places where coffee –let alone good coffee – is hard to come by. Thus, traveling with the coffee of your preference is a good idea.

I had been traveling with a camping pour-over style coffee filter for a while but this year I was all about the AeroPress.

AeroPress was designed by Alan Adler, who interestingly also designed the Aerobie flying disk. The AeroPress is his answer to the quest of being able to make a single cup of coffee that’s rich yet smooth in flavour without the acidity of a French Press or the hassle and price tag of a coffee machine.

Years of coffee tasting and no less than forty prototypes later, Alder finally had it. The result: a couple of inexpensive plastic parts and a small, round filter.

The AeroPress is similar to a syringe in that there are two cylinders. The smaller of the two fit inside the bigger one and works kind of like a plunger. A third piece is a cap that holds the paper filter and screws onto the wider cylinder, which is essentially the brewing chamber.

Simply put, you place a paper filter in the cap, screw the cap onto the wider of the two cylinders, and place it on top of a cup. You then add a scoop or two of freshly ground coffee onto the filter, pour hot water (175 degrees if you want to get picky) onto the ground coffee, stir a few times and then place the smaller cylinder –the plunger – inside the brewing chamber and push down. And done – one cup of coffee ready to enjoy immediately.

The AeroPress has gained quite a cult following, and everyone seems to have their own technique on how to make a cup of coffee after there own preference. So much so, that barristas and coffee geeks can compete in an annual World AeroPress Championships!

Why I like it so much: At $30 USD, the Aerobie AeroPress is a highly affordable coffee maker. It’s also super easy to clean, compact and since it’s made entirely of BPA-free plastic, incredibly durable, making it very travel-friendly. And lastly, it makes great tasting coffee in just a matter of minutes.

Price: $30 USD
www. aerobie.com

Aerobie AeroPress Coffee Maker

by VeloClub

Coffee and cycling, cycling and coffee. It’s a beautiful, long-standing pairing and the coffee culture among cyclists seems bigger than ever before.  But cycling also tends to take you to new, and often remote, places where coffee –let alone good coffee – is hard to come by. Thus, traveling with the coffee of your preference is a good idea.

I had been traveling with a camping pour-over style coffee filter for a while but this year I was all about the AeroPress.

AeroPress was designed by Alan Adler, who interestingly also designed the Aerobie flying disk. The AeroPress is his answer to the quest of being able to make a single cup of coffee that’s rich yet smooth in flavour without the acidity of a French Press or the hassle and price tag of a coffee machine.

Years of coffee tasting and no less than forty prototypes later, Alder finally had it. The result: a couple of inexpensive plastic parts and a small, round filter.

The AeroPress is similar to a syringe in that there are two cylinders. The smaller of the two fit inside the bigger one and works kind of like a plunger. A third piece is a cap that holds the paper filter and screws onto the wider cylinder, which is essentially the brewing chamber.

Simply put, you place a paper filter in the cap, screw the cap onto the wider of the two cylinders, and place it on top of a cup. You then add a scoop or two of freshly ground coffee onto the filter, pour hot water (175 degrees if you want to get picky) onto the ground coffee, stir a few times and then place the smaller cylinder –the plunger – inside the brewing chamber and push down. And done – one cup of coffee ready to enjoy immediately.

The AeroPress has gained quite a cult following, and everyone seems to have their own technique on how to make a cup of coffee after there own preference. So much so, that barristas and coffee geeks can compete in an annual World AeroPress Championships!

Why I like it so much: At $30 USD, the Aerobie AeroPress is a highly affordable coffee maker. It’s also super easy to clean, compact and since it’s made entirely of BPA-free plastic, incredibly durable, making it very travel-friendly. And lastly, it makes great tasting coffee in just a matter of minutes.

Price: $30 USD
www. aerobie.com

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