Daily News Digest

by Mark Zalewski

July 8, 2016

In today’s CT Daily News Digest: Twenty-nine at the line! Cavendish surpasses Hinault, slots into second in all-time Tour stage wins; Giro Rosa Round-up: Stevens wins atop Madonna della Guardia, Guarnier is back in pink; Sterbini soloes to Austria stage victory; Von Hoff sprints to stage win in Sibiu Cycling Tour; Tour leader Van Avermaet on taking yellow: ‘I think it’s once in a lifetime for me’; Holm: ‘If Dan Martin doesn’t finish top ten I’ll cut off his ears’; How Greg Henderson went beyond the call of duty to make Tour de France team; Rights groups urge sponsors not to back Bahrain WorldTour team; Report: Contador to Trek-Segafredo in 2017; 19-year-old suspended for EPO use; British Cycling and Cycling UK call for more land access for bikes; Cyclocosm’s How the Week Was Won: 2016 Tour de France, Stages 1-5; Mara Abbott on the Giro Rosa; Tour de France, stage 5 on-board highlights; Tour de France rider quiz: Who’s the grumpiest rider?; Life on the Tour: CyclingTips 2016 Tour de France Vlog, part 1; Alaphilippe pulls one of the oldest tricks in the book

British Cycling and Cycling UK call for more land access for bikes

by CyclingTips

Open letters to Environment Secretary Liz Truss and Welsh Environment Secretary Lesley Griffiths penned by the two main cycling advocacy groups in the UK, British Cycling and Cycling UK, are calling for more access to off-road public areas in England and Wales.

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Cycling in Wales

“Due to archaic public access and rights of way laws, it is currently illegal for people on bikes to access the majority of the countryside in England and Wales,” the letter said. “At present, if you choose to ride a bike you only have access to less than a third of the 140,000 miles of public paths. There is also little access to the three million acres of Open Access Land or the 2,800 miles of newly created coastal access. Meanwhile, if you are on foot you have free and open access to all of this land.

“England and Wales is packed with outstanding countryside on millions of people’s doorsteps but, due to outdated and confusing rights of way legislation, much of it is only open to you if you choose to walk,” said British Cycling chief executive Ian Drake.

“We know that many people will simply not consider cycling unless they can do it on a traffic-free route. While national and local government work on putting cycle lanes in place across our towns and cities, countryside paths are fantastic, free alternatives that could be enjoyed responsibly by mountain bikers and families alike. At a time when obesity levels and air pollution in our cities is at an all-time high, we call on the government to act to make sure that the massive opportunity to get active in the countryside is not wasted.”

The campaign cites the 2003 Scottish Land Reform Act which opened up access for cycling. As a result studies found mountain biking increased by 10% from 2011 to 2014 and is worth £49.5 million per year to the Scottish economy.

Click through to read more at Singletrack Magazine.

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