End of UKAD inquiry ‘not an exoneration’; Cycliq Fly6 CE update: Daily News Digest

by Shane Stokes

November 17, 2017

British MP: ending of UKAD investigation into Wiggins and Sky ‘not an exoneration’; Questions over British Cycling/Team Sky doctor Richard Freeman; Former Giro winner Cunego hoping for wildcard invite, wants to retire at 2018 race; Cycliq adds brighter, lighter and connected Fly6 CE and Fly12 CE to range; Orucase Airport Ninja bike case now available in United States for rental; Video: Huge crowds at the Tour of Rwanda; Video: MTB masterclass: Matt Jones – Frames Of Mind; Video: A look back at klunking – the first mountain biking; Video: Jiu Jitsu sneak attacks

British MP: ending of UKAD investigation into Wiggins and Sky ‘not an exoneration’

by VeloClub

Although Bradley Wiggins suggested this week that the announced ending of UKAD’s investigation into the delivery of a mysterious package to Team Sky was essentially a declaration of his innocence, the British Member of Parliament looking into the matter has said this is not the case.

Wiggins issued a statement on Wednesday suggesting he was cleared. “It has always been the case that no such charges could be brought against me as no anti-doping violations took place,” he said. “I am pleased that this has finally been confirmed publicly.” However the UKAD statement announcing the end of the investigation made clear it was stopping due to a lack of medical records, noting that it ‘remains unable to confirm or refute the account that the package delivered to Team Sky contained Fluimucil [a legal medication].’

British politician Damian Collins is the chair of the Culture Media and Sport select committee which has also been looking into the matter and was clear in his own assessment. “This is not an exoneration of anyone,” he told The Daily Telegraph. “What’s clear from UKAD’s statement is if Sky and British Cycling had kept proper medical records, this could have been wrapped up a lot sooner. It is unacceptable. A cloud now hangs over one of our greatest Olympians.

“I think it clearly shows that UKAD does not have the powers it needs and I’ve been very clear on this. UKAD currently relies on people’s willingness to cooperate. It has no legal authority to compel anyone to speak.”

Collins has said that he favoured making doping a criminal offence, something which would give UKAD and others far greater power to investigate. He said that the select committee’s report into doping in sport is due to be published ‘in the next few weeks.’

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