Your Thursday Daily News Digest

by Mark Zalewski

November 17, 2016

In today’s CyclingTips Daily News Digest: Resurrection man: Keagan Girdlestone’s remarkable recovery from a near-fatal crash; Norwegian federation alleges junior rider intentionally struck by police vehicle in Qatar; Thomas Dekker confirms ‘Luigi’ as his Puerto code name; Wiggins breaks media silence at Ghent Six Day; Allan Peiper believes Richie Porte can with the 2017 Tour; Dutch Giro start organisers report loss of 400,000 Euros; Segafredo extends sponsorship for two years; Norma Gimondi running for head of Italian Cycling Federation; ORICA-BikeExchange finalises roster; Mike Creed talks about plans for new team; 100th anniversary of record-breaking ride from Adelaide to Darwin celebrated; 1992 AIS road team documentary.

Norwegian federation alleges junior rider intentionally struck by police vehicle in Qatar

by CyclingTips

The Norwegian Cycling Federation has disclosed that it believes that one of its riders, junior Susanne Andersen, was intentionally hit by a police vehicle in Doha, Qatar during the UCI Road World Championships. The federation chose not to immediately report the case — fearing that Andersen would not be allowed to leave the country.

Susanne Andersen (right) finished third in the junior women's road race.

Susanne Andersen (right) finished third in the junior women’s road race.

Andersen, 18,  was riding back to her hotel following the time trial event when she was struck by a police vehicle. She said that she believes it was because of what she was wearing. “We were told that it is not unusual for women with bare legs [to be hassled] because it is considered to be controversial clothing.”

Federation sport manager Hans Falk also believes it was an intentional act, though admits he cannot prove it. “I am convinced that it was a deliberate action by the policeman who drove right into Susanne,” said Falk. “I can not say for sure, but there were no skid marks, and he showed no empathy. Instead he lit a cigarette and talked on the phone oblivious to the girl who was lying on the ground, screaming.

“We were urged not to report the matter and were told if we did we would not be allowed to leave the country. We thought it was best that Susanne came home.”

Andersen fortunately only suffered bruises and scrapes, and would go on to win the bronze medal in the road race.

Click through to read more at TV 2.

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