Your Tuesday Daily News Digest

by Shane Stokes

June 13, 2017

Matthews wins stage three of the Tour de Suisse, grabs yellow jersey; Philipsen wins stage four of the ‘Baby Giro’ Under 23 Giro d’Italia; British Cycling report on bullying and sexism to be published on Wednesday; De Gendt diagnosed with injury but can continue training for Tour de France; Luis Leon Sanchez inks new contract with Astana; UCI rejigs Jingle Cross timing; Report: exercise makes you younger at the cellular level; Video: Under 23 Giro d’Italia race leader Pavel Sivakov speaks after stage three; Video: Critérium du Dauphiné 2017 Stage 8 | Onboard GoPro Highlights; Video: Girona Pyrenees & Coll de la Creueta – Cycling Inspiration & Education

Report: exercise makes you younger at the cellular level

by VeloClub

Bike riders the world over will be encouraged by a new study which appeared in the Preventive Medicine journal, which states that the more exercise people get, the less their cells appear to age. Compared to those who were sedentary, high exercisers exhibited up to nine years less cellular aging.

Here’s an extract from a Time article on the study:

In a new study in Preventive Medicine, people who exercised the most had biological aging markers that appeared nine years younger than those who were sedentary.

Researchers looked at the telomeres from nearly 6,000 adults enrolled in a multi-year survey run by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. People were asked what physical activities they had done in the past month and how vigorously they did them. They also provided DNA samples, from which the researchers measured telomere length.

Telomeres, the protein caps on the ends of human chromosomes, are markers of aging and overall health. Every time a cell replicates, a tiny bit of telomere is lost, so they get shorter with age. But they shrink faster in some people than in others, explains study author Larry Tucker, professor of exercise science at Brigham Young University.

“We know that, in general, people with shorter telomeres die sooner and are more likely to develop many of our chronic diseases,” says Tucker. “It’s not perfect, but it’s a very good index of biological aging.”

Click through to read more at Time.

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