Your Friday Daily News Digest

by Mark Zalewski

November 4, 2016

In today’s CyclingTips Daily News Digest: Haas on Lachlan Morton: ‘His potential is limitless if he wants it to be’; Armstrong appears in federal court as judge hears arguments; Helen Wyman posts update on medical condition; The Death of the Local Bike Shop?; Bike stolen from cyclist killed in hit-and-run; British Cycling emphasising ‘culture’ in search for performance director; Bjarne Riis becomes partner in Danish team Virtu Pro-Veloconcept; Stan Siejka Classic final race for Tasmanian trio of Goss, Sulzberger brothers; Trek issues recall of select Farley fatbike models; Cyclist crowdfunding South Pole record attempt; Research studies of air pollution affects high-speed cyclists; Researchers test altruism with staged bicycle accident; Strider Bike World Championship.

Researchers test altruism with staged bicycle accident

by CyclingTips

Researchers at Cambridge University utilised a staged bicycle accident scenario to test the theory that empathy can predict altruism in people. The study based its results on if people stopped to help the victim or not.

Experimenter 1 was seated on a bench at position A, the confederate was situated at position B, and Experimenter 2 was seated outside of the participants` field of view at position C.

Experimenter 1 was seated on a bench at position A, the confederate was situated at position B, and Experimenter 2 was seated outside of the participants` field of view at position C.

A total of 1067 passers-by were counted and 55 of those participated in the study, which occurred following either interaction or non-interaction with the person acting injured. In total, only seven percent stopped to offer help to the injured person.

“The main reason for both seemed to be that people were simply in a rush to get somewhere, which has been shown to reduce helping behavior,” the researchers wrote.

Of the ones that stopped to help, 80 percent were female.

Not surprisingly, the study concluded that the more empathetic a person is the more likely he or she are to stop and offer help. “The act of doing good is correlated with empathy. This in turn may suggest empathy to be a key motivator for helping behavior.”

Click through to read more at Taylor & Francis.

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