Login to VeloClub|Not a member?   Sign up now.

MPCC blasts WADA response, Henao chases Giro success: Daily News Digest

by Shane Stokes

October 19, 2017

MPCC describes WADA response on Tramdol and cortisol as ‘reckless’; Henao chasing Giro youth classification victory in 2018; Greipel: I will do everything I can to aim for my 12th Tour stage win; Deignan extends with Team Sky: ‘It was a very easy decision’; La Course scaled back to one-day event; advocates miffed; Ellsay Siblings join Rally; Hagens Berman Supermint adds ambassador program; Smartphones are killing Americans, but nobody is counting; Video: Pls do not count this; 78 mile portrait on Strava

Smartphones are killing Americans, but nobody is counting

by CyclingTips

In an interesting and worrying article, Bloomberg has looked at a 14.4 percent surge in traffic fatalities in the US in the past two years. It argues that cellphone usage is likely the prime factor in the rise.

Here’s an excerpt:

There are however three big clues, and they don’t rest along the highway. One, as you may have guessed, is the substantial increase in smartphone use by U.S. drivers as they drive. From 2014 to 2016, the share of Americans who owned an iPhone, Android phone, or something comparable rose from 75 percent to 81 percent.

The second is the changing way in which Americans use their phones while they drive. These days, we’re pretty much done talking. Texting, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram are the order of the day—all activities that require far more attention than simply holding a gadget to your ear or responding to a disembodied voice. By 2015, almost 70 percent of Americans were using their phones to share photos and follow news events via social media. In just two additional years, that figure has jumped to 80 percent.

Finally, the increase in fatalities has been largely among bicyclists, motorcyclists, and pedestrians—all of whom are easier to miss from the driver’s seat than, say, a 4,000-pound SUV—especially if you’re glancing up from your phone rather than concentrating on the road. Last year, 5,987 pedestrians were killed by cars in the U.S., almost 1,100 more than in 2014—that’s a 22 percent increase in just two years.

Click through to read more at Bloomberg.

Comments are closed.

BACK TO TOP
10 NEW ARTICLES
April 24, 2018
April 23, 2018
April 21, 2018