Login to VeloClub|Not a member?   Sign up now.

Your Friday Daily News Digest

by Mark Zalewski

February 10, 2017

In today’s CyclingTips Daily News Digest: ‘I like round numbers:’ Roche pinpoints desired career end point; Mark Gunter Photographer of the Year Awards: Young Cyclist Assistance recipients announced; CyclingTips podcast, Episode 25: Risk vs reward: What drives amateur bike racers to risk life and limb?; Impey, Moolman-Pasio win South African TT titles; No culture of fear at British Cycling according to former coach; Chairman of British Cycling steps down; Tour de France stage winner Serge Baguet dies at 47; Bardet ready to start racing; Route change for Tour de Langkawi; Motorist charged with killing two cyclists routinely drove while drinking; Study claims psychological problems for people who post fitness achievements on social media; Hydrographics on a bike frame; Abu Dhabi Tour teaser video.

Study claims psychological problems for people who post fitness achievements on social media

by CyclingTips

Many of us have those friends who always posts their latest ride or FTP test numbers on social media (if not, maybe it’s you?). Researchers from Brunel University in London conducted a study to find out why people share their workouts on social media, concluding that people with higher volume of posts tend to be narcissists.

“Narcissists’ use of Facebook for attention-seeking and validation explained their greater likelihood of updating about their accomplishments and their diet and exercise routine,” the study found.

“Furthermore, narcissists’ tendency to update about their accomplishments explained the greater number of likes and comments that they reported receiving to their updates.

“Although our results suggest that narcissists’ bragging pays off because they receive more likes and comments to their status updates, it could be that their Facebook friends politely offer support while secretly disliking such egotistical displays. Greater awareness of how one’s status updates might be perceived by friends could help people to avoid topics that annoy more than they entertain.”

Click through to read more at Science Direct.

Comments are closed.

BACK TO TOP
25 NEW ARTICLES