Daily News Digest

by Mark Zalewski

April 15, 2016

In today’s edition of the CT Daily News Digest: McClay wins GP de Denain; Johansson wins Euskal Emakumeen, stage 1; By the numbers: What it takes to win Paris-Roubaix; UCI makes it official: disc brake use is suspended pending further talks; Eddy Merckx: Disc brakes too dangerous for racing; How to beat the dreaded post race blues; Adriano Malori continues to improve; Philippe Gilbert to race Amstel Gold; WADA amends position on meldonium positives; Three Weeks To The Giro; Profile: Velocio’s Tayler Wiles; 1 in 20 among Melbourne roads closed this Sunday morning; Boonen on the 2016 Paris-Roubaix

UCI makes it official: disc brake use is suspended pending further talks

by VeloClub

Stating that rider safety is an absolute priority, the UCI has confirmed media reports on Wednesday that the usage of disc brakes in the peloton will be suspended.

The braking systems came under the spotlight in Sunday’s Paris-Roubaix when the Spanish rider Fran Ventoso suffered serious lacerations in a crash. Rumoured since the race, Ventoso’s injury was confirmed by the rider himself yesterday.

He released an open letter describing how the injuries were sustained, and also releasing some rather gruesome images of the damage.

“The Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) today announces that it has decided to suspend, with immediate effect, the trial of disc brakes currently being carried out in road races,” said the governing body in a statement.

“This decision follows a request to do so made by the Association Internationale des Groupes Cyclistes Professionnels (AIGCP) – which represents all professional cycling teams – following the injuries suffered by Movistar Team rider Francisco Ventoso at Sunday’s Paris-Roubaix Classic. This request is supported by the Cyclistes Professionnels Associés (CPA), which represents riders.”

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