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Your Wednesday Daily News Digest

by Neal Rogers

March 22, 2017

In today’s edition of the CyclingTips Daily News Digest: Movistar wins Stage 2 team time trial at Volta Ciclista a Catalunya, but Rojas relegated for pushing; With 2,000km now complete, Kristof Allegaert continues to lead the Indian Pacific Wheel Race ; Oleg Tinkov disparages Alberto Contador in Instagram post; Teams announced for 2017 Tour de Yorkshire; Warbasse on disc brakes in pro peloton: ‘It’s not a fight over a braking system, it’s a fight for power’; Egyptian Eslam Nasser Zaki dies at African Continental Track Cycling Championships; Video: Drone footage of Travis McCabe winning the final stage of the Tucson Bicycle Classic.

Warbasse on disc brakes in pro peloton: ‘It’s not a fight over a braking system, it’s a fight for power’

by Neal Rogers

In a column for Rouleur, American Larry Warbasse (Aqua Blue Sport) addressed the disc-brake controversy in the peloton, saying that, for professional racers, the matter isn’t just about performance or safety, but rather having their voices heard.

“We are open to progress, to innovation, to any technology that could help us ride our bikes faster and safer, but we are no longer open to our voices going unheard,” Warbasse writes.

“When I see much of the disc brake-related content on the web, from articles to videos, social media posts and the like, I see a significant amount of commentary negatively directed at us pros. They poke, prod, make fun of us, tell us we are wrong.

But I ask these same people to think about one thing: each and every rider in our professional peloton is a human being. They are sons, husbands, boyfriends, many of them fathers. They have families to go home to. We must weigh the positives and negatives of every risk we take, and if one of them seems unnecessary, then we must not proceed.

Most of the decisions in this sport have been made without us. Whether it’s on course design, regulations or rules, our voices are seldom heard. Just recently, however, us riders have begun to realise an important point. This professional sport does not happen without us. We are the most important piece of the puzzle – without us, it cannot be complete.”

To read the full essay, click through to Rouleur.

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