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Your Wednesday Daily News Digest

by Mark Zalewski

April 19, 2017

In today’s CyclingTips Daily News Digest: Dennis takes stage win, Pinot leads at Tour of the Alps; Modolo sprints to win at Tour of Croatia opener; Gilbert out of Giro d’Italia; Greg Van Avermaet felt ‘let down by the team’ at Amstel Gold Race; 2018 UCI Road World Championship course could be toughest in history; Western Australia to push for new laws for cyclist safety; Appeal denied for driver who made gun gesture at cyclist, BBC presenter; Community rallies to replace bike stolen from elderly woman; Video: Riders ride through roundabout at Tour of Croatia; Video: Canyon/SRAM ready for La Fléche Wallonne; Video: 2017 UCI Mountain Bike World Cup; Video: Don’t Forget Fun with Team Wooly Mammoth.

Western Australia to push for new laws for cyclist safety

by CyclingTips

The government of Western Australia has said it will push for new laws aimed to protect cyclists in light of a growing culture of aggression on the roads, The West Australian reports.

Anthea Stacey told the newspaper recounted a time when she was sprayed in the face with a lubricant spray during a recent ride. Other cyclists told tales of drivers swerving into their path and other incidents of intimidation against cyclists. Westcycle chief executive Matt Fulton said there is growing trend of aggression on the roads, and not just toward cyclists.

“Australia has a societal problem that has escalated to the point where it is acceptable to treat other people with absolute disrespect the moment we are on the road,” Fulton said. “The amount of road rage and antisocial behaviour is evident on a daily basis regardless of the form of vehicle you are using.

However, Fulton points out that cyclists are much more susceptible to negative outcomes of road aggression, and a one-metre passing law would be a step in the right direction.

“In the case of bike riders, this behaviour can have far more severe consequences due to their vulnerability. Riders have a greater vested interest in ensuring the problem is stamped out.

Click through to read more at The West Australian.

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