Your Friday Daily News Digest

by Mark Zalewski

December 2, 2016

In today’s CyclingTips Daily News Digest: Chris Froome to start his 2017 season in Australia at Cadel’s Race and the Sun Tour; Gaimon begins retirement by hunting banned rider’s Strava KOMs; Paddy Bevin on his WorldTour debut: ‘I took a bit of a beating’; UCI and Wanda Sports sign partnership to transform cycling in China; Shane Sutton on short list for Cycling Australia high performance director job; Tom Veelers announced retirement due to ongoing knee injury; Why not Froome as BBC’s Sports Personality of the Year?; Peter Sagan Wins Velo D’Or; Hayman backs Matthews’ team move for green jersey aspirations; Wiggins listed on British Cycling’s 2017 podium programme; Cylance Pro Cycling names men’s roster; No Grand Départ for Portsmouth in 2019, but hopes for a future bid; Controversy brewing over grant for Irish government head’s cycling club; Colombian cycling photographer Horacio Gil Ochoa.

Why not Froome as BBC’s Sports Personality of the Year?

by CyclingTips

Surely a third Tour de France title would at least get Chris Froome on the nominee list for the BBC’s Sports Personality of the Year award. And yet, he is absent once again, even in a year where he also won an Olympic medal. Four other cyclists — Jason Kenny, Laura Kenny, Sarah Storey and Kadeena Cox — all made the list, and all for notable achievements. Why was Froome left aside? Nigel Wynn ponders the reasons. Here is an excerpt:

The final podium presentation of the 2016 Tour de France, from left: Romain Bardet (Ag2r-La Mondiale), Chris Froome (Team Sky), and Nairo Quintana (Movistar). Photo: Cor Vos.

The final podium presentation of the 2016 Tour de France, from left: Romain Bardet (Ag2r-La Mondiale), Chris Froome (Team Sky), and Nairo Quintana (Movistar). Photo: Cor Vos.


According to the rules, the nominees must: Reflect UK’s sporting achievements on the national and/or international stage; Represent the breadth and depth of UK sports; and take into account ‘impact’ of the person’s sporting achievement beyond the sport in question.

Perhaps it is Froome’s upbringing that has counted against him. As is widely known, Froome was born in Kenya, lived in South Africa as a teenager and now lives in Monaco. However, he has held a British passport since birth, his grandparents are British, and he registered as a British national and started racing under a British licence in 2008. He also belongs to British-based Team Sky. He identifies himself as British.

Or perhaps the world in general is cautious of professional road cycling. In the era after Lance Armstrong’s admission that he doped during his career, the already shaky reputation of the sport has taken a massive hit.

Fueling that fire during 2016 has been the illegal hacking and publication of therapeutic use exemption (TUE) certificates by the Fancy Bears group, including those belonging to Froome and former Team Sky team-mate Sir Bradley Wiggins.

Click through to read more at Cycling Weekly.

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